Hungry brains: A meta-analytical review of brain activation imaging studies on food perception and appetite in obese individuals

F. Devoto, L. Zapparoli, R. Bonandrini, M. Berlingeri, A. Ferrulli, L. Luzi, G. Banfi, E. Paulesu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The dysregulation of food intake in chronic obesity has been explained by different theories. To assess their explanatory power, we meta-analyzed 22 brain-activation imaging studies. We found that obese individuals exhibit hyper-responsivity of the brain regions involved in taste and reward for food-related stimuli. Consistent with a Reward Surfeit Hypothesis, obese individuals exhibit a ventral striatum hyper-responsivity in response to pure tastes, particularly when fasting. Furthermore, we found that obese subjects display more frequent ventral striatal activation for visual food cues when satiated: this continued processing within the reward system, together with the aforementioned evidence, is compatible with the Incentive Sensitization Theory. On the other hand, we did not find univocal evidence in favor of a Reward Deficit Hypothesis nor for a systematic deficit of inhibitory cognitive control. We conclude that the available brain activation data on the dysregulated food intake and food-related behavior in chronic obesity can be best framed within an Incentive Sensitization Theory. Implications of these findings for a brain-based therapy of obesity are briefly discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-285
Number of pages15
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume94
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2018

Keywords

  • Activation likelihood estimation
  • Hierarchical clustering
  • Meta-analysis
  • Neuroimaging
  • Obesity
  • Reward system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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