Hyper-IgM, neutropenia, mild infections and low response to polyclonal stimulation: Hyper-IgM syndrome or common variable immunodeficiency?

M. M. Rosado, A. Picchianti Diamanti, S. Cascioli, S. Ceccarelli, S. Caporuscio, R. D'Amelio, R. Carsetti, B. Laganà

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A young woman presenting respiratory infections, polyarthritis, severe neutropenia, and increased serum IgM was treated with Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) with good clinical and laboratory outcome followed by a loss of efficacy. The increased serum IgM associated to recurrent infections and autoimmune manifestations suggested the diagnosis of a hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGMs). The frequency of peripheral T cells, the expression of CD40 on the patients' B cells and CD40L on T cells and the Activation-Induced cytidine Deaminase (AID) and Uracyl-DNA glycosylase (UNG) at mRNA level was comparable to controls. In contrast, the frequency of B cells was one half of the healthy control and all cells showed an atypical phenotype. Although AID and UNG were normal, class-switch recombination was not very efficient because circulating switched memory were reduced and, once stimulated with CpG, generated less antibody-secreting cells than controls. An increase in serum B Lymphocytes stimulator (BLyS) was also found. The patient presented a peculiar clinical and immunological phenotype fitting for many aspects of both HIGM4 and Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID). These findings underline the need to better explore the complex link between these two diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)983-991
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology
Volume24
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Keywords

  • Class switch recombination
  • Common variable immunodeficiency
  • Hyper-IgM syndrome
  • Intravenous immunoglobulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

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