Hypergravity impairs angiogenic response of in vitro cultured human primary endothelial cells

Enzo Spisni, Maria Cristina Bianco, Francesca Blasi, Spartaco Santi, Mattia Toni, Cristiana Griffoni, Vittorio Tomasi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A variety of evidence suggest that cardiovascular system functions are impaired in altered gravity conditions [1]. In this study we investigated the influence of hypergravity environment (3g) on endothelial cell proliferation, endothelial vasoactive compound production and on in vitro angiogenesis. We found that cultured primary human endothial cells were very sensitive to mild hypergravity conditions. Even if we did not record changes in cell viability and apoptosis, we found significant differences in cell proliferation, prostacyclin (PGI2) synthesis, nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, and in angiogenic responses. Using western blotting technique we detected an increased expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) in primary endothelial cells exposed for 48 hours to hypergravity, in comparison to those exposed to normal gravity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEuropean Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP
Pages327-328
Number of pages2
Edition501
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2002
EventProceedings of the European Symposium on Life in Space for Life on Earth - Stockholm, Sweden
Duration: Jun 2 2002Jun 7 2002

Other

OtherProceedings of the European Symposium on Life in Space for Life on Earth
CountrySweden
CityStockholm
Period6/2/026/7/02

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Endothelial cells
Cell proliferation
Gravitation
Cardiovascular system
Nitric oxide
Cell death
Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering

Cite this

Spisni, E., Bianco, M. C., Blasi, F., Santi, S., Toni, M., Griffoni, C., & Tomasi, V. (2002). Hypergravity impairs angiogenic response of in vitro cultured human primary endothelial cells. In European Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP (501 ed., pp. 327-328)

Hypergravity impairs angiogenic response of in vitro cultured human primary endothelial cells. / Spisni, Enzo; Bianco, Maria Cristina; Blasi, Francesca; Santi, Spartaco; Toni, Mattia; Griffoni, Cristiana; Tomasi, Vittorio.

European Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP. 501. ed. 2002. p. 327-328.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Spisni, E, Bianco, MC, Blasi, F, Santi, S, Toni, M, Griffoni, C & Tomasi, V 2002, Hypergravity impairs angiogenic response of in vitro cultured human primary endothelial cells. in European Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP. 501 edn, pp. 327-328, Proceedings of the European Symposium on Life in Space for Life on Earth, Stockholm, Sweden, 6/2/02.
Spisni E, Bianco MC, Blasi F, Santi S, Toni M, Griffoni C et al. Hypergravity impairs angiogenic response of in vitro cultured human primary endothelial cells. In European Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP. 501 ed. 2002. p. 327-328
Spisni, Enzo ; Bianco, Maria Cristina ; Blasi, Francesca ; Santi, Spartaco ; Toni, Mattia ; Griffoni, Cristiana ; Tomasi, Vittorio. / Hypergravity impairs angiogenic response of in vitro cultured human primary endothelial cells. European Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP. 501. ed. 2002. pp. 327-328
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