Hyperoxia in head injury

Therapeutic tool?

Luca Longhi, Nino Stocchetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: Currently, no neuroprotective therapies have been shown to reduce the secondary neuronal damage occurring after traumatic brain injury. Recent studies have addressed the potentiality of hyperoxia to ameliorate brain metabolism after traumatic brain injury. In this article, we present the principles of oxygen transport to the brain, the effects of hyperoxia on cerebral metabolism, and the role of lactate in brain metabolism after traumatic brain injury. Recent findings: It has been shown that hyperoxia obtained by increasing the inspired fraction of oxygen results in a decreased cerebral lactate concentration measured in the extracellular space using the microdialysis. However, the brain oxygen delivery is not substantially improved by eubaric hyperoxia and the ratio between lactate and pyruvate (a better indicator of the cellular redox state than lactate alone) is not changed by hyperoxia. In addition, it has been shown the lactate might be an alternative fuel for neurons during the acute postinjury phase. Summary: At present, there is no evidence supporting any clinical benefit of hyperoxia in brain-injured patients, and the meaning of posttraumatic brain extracellular lactate accumulation should be further investigated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-109
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Critical Care
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Hyperoxia
Craniocerebral Trauma
Lactic Acid
Brain
Oxygen
Therapeutics
Microdialysis
Extracellular Space
Pyruvic Acid
Oxidation-Reduction
Neurons
Traumatic Brain Injury

Keywords

  • Brain metabolism
  • Brain oxygenation
  • Hyperoxia
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Hyperoxia in head injury : Therapeutic tool? / Longhi, Luca; Stocchetti, Nino.

In: Current Opinion in Critical Care, Vol. 10, No. 2, 04.2004, p. 105-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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