Hyperparathyroidism does not influence the abnormal primary haemostasis in patients with chronic renal failure

G. Vigano, E. Gotti, E. Comberti, A. Giangrande, R. Trevisan, G. Remuzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Patients with chronic renal failure suffer from secondary hyperparathyroidism and have greatly increased blood concentrations of intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH fragments. Thus PTH has been regarded in the last few years as a uraemic toxin possibly responsible for many clinical manifestations of the uraemic syndrome including a tendency to prolonged bleeding. Since PTH inhibits platelet aggregation 'in vitro', the possibility that hyperparathyroidism of uraemia plays a role in the pathogenesis of ureamic bleeding has been considered. Clinical data to support this possibility is not available so far. In this study we have correlated the skin bleeding time, the best clinical marker of uraemic bleeding tendency, with serum concentrations of intact PTH or PTH fragments in 40 patients with chronic renal failure undergoing chronic haemodialysis. Since the skin bleeding time is known to be influenced by packed cell volume (PCV), we also considered two distinct groups of uraemic patients on the basis of their PCV values. The results indicated that bleeding time does not correlate with serum concentrations of intact PTH or PTH fragments. Also, no correlation has been found between PTH values and blood concentrations of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and hydroxyproline. It is concluded that elevated PTH values in renal-failure patients do not contribute to uraemic platelet defect, as reflected by the skin bleeding time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)971-974
Number of pages4
JournalNephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Volume4
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 1989

Keywords

  • bleeding time
  • parathyroid hormone
  • uraemic bleeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

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