Hypoalgesic and motor effects of neural mobilisation versus soft‐tissue interventions in experimental craniofacial hyperalgesia: A single‐blinded randomised controlled trial

Marta Díaz‐sáez, Cristina Sáenz‐jiménez, Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Alba Paris‐alemany, Roy La Touche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The present trial aimed to compare the effects of the mobilisation of the nervous system (NS) to those of a soft‐tissue intervention in subjects exposed to an experimentally induced hyperalgesia of the masticatory muscles. Methods: The study was a single‐blinded randomised controlled trial. A total of 49 participants (mean ± SD age: 41 ± 11 years; 61% female) with latent myofascial trigger points (LMTrPs) in the craniofacial region were randomly assigned to one of three groups: neural mobilisation (NM), soft‐tissues techniques and stretching (STT‐S), and control group (CG). An initial assessment (baseline) was performed before the provocation chewing masticatory test. The pre‐treatment measurements were registered 24 hours later. Next, the randomised intervention was applied, and afterwards, post‐treatment data were obtained. Outcome measures included pain‐free maximum mouth opening (MMO), pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in the trigeminal and cervical region, and trigeminal and cervical two‐point discrimination (TPD). Results: ANOVA revealed significant differences for the time × group interaction for pain‐free MMO and PPTs. The results showed an improvement in the MMO and the PPTs for NM and STT‐S groups but not for the CG. There were no differences between the NM and STT‐S groups. However, the effect sizes were large for the NM and medium for the STT‐S. No differences were found for TDP between groups nor over time. Conclusion: The results show that with NM and STT‐S techniques, we could influence motor and sensory variables in asymptomatic subjects with LMTrPs after a masticatory provocation test. Both techniques increased MMO and PPTs in the short term. These beneficial effects lead us to consider the importance of including these methods in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4434
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume10
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2021

Keywords

  • Manual therapy, pressure pain threshold
  • Myofascial trigger points
  • Neural mobilisation
  • Neurodynamics
  • Provocation chewing test
  • Soft‐tissue
  • Trigeminal nerve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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