Identification of reference microRNAs and suitability of archived hemopoietic samples for robust microRNA expression profiling

Virginie F. Viprey, Maria V. Corrias, Susan A. Burchill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In many cancers, including neuroblastoma, microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) may increase understanding of the metastatic process and lead to the identification of clinically informative biomarkers. The quality of miRNAs in PB and BM samples archived in PAXgene™ blood RNA tubes from large-scale clinical studies and the identity of reference miRNAs for standard reporting of data are to date unknown. In this study, we evaluated the reliability of expression profiling of 377 miRNAs using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in PB and BM samples (n = 90) stored at -80°C for up to 5 years in PAXgene™ blood RNA tubes. There was no correlation with storage time and variation of expression for any single miRNA (r <0.50). The profile of miRNAs isolated as small RNAs or co-isolated with small/large RNAs was highly correlated (r = 0.96). The mean expression of all miRNAs and the geNorm program identified miR-26a, miR-28-5p, and miR-24 as the most stable reference miRNAs. This study describes detailed methodologies for reliable miRNA isolation and profiling of PB and BM, including reference miRNAs for qPCR normalization, and demonstrates the suitability of clinical samples archived at -80°C into PAXgene™ blood RNA tubes for miRNA expression studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)566-572
Number of pages7
JournalAnalytical Biochemistry
Volume421
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 15 2012

Keywords

  • Blood
  • Bone marrow
  • Long-term storage
  • MicroRNAs
  • Neuroblastoma
  • PAXgene™ blood RNA tube
  • Reference microRNAs
  • RT-qPCR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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