Identification of three candidate mutations causing type IIA von willebrand disease using a rapid, nonradioactive, allele-specific hybridization method

Aida Inbal, Talma Englender, Nurit Kornbrot, Anna M. Randi, Giancarlo Castaman, Pier M. Mannucci, J. Evan Sadler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Type IIA von Willebrand disease (vWD), the most common type II vWD variant, is characterized by decreased binding of von Willebrand factor (vWF) to platelet glycoprotein Ib (GpIb) and by a decrease in large and intermediate vWF multimers. Mutations reported to cause vWD type MA are clustered within the A2 domain of vWF, which is encoded by exon 28. Genomic DNA from affected members of 12 unrelated families with type IIA vWD were screened for these mutations by a rapid, nonradioactive, allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization method. Oligonucleotides containing each of eight mutations were cross-linked onto a nylon membrane by UV irradiation. A fragment of vWF exon 28 was amplified from peripheral blood leukocyte DNA using biotinylated primers and hybridized to the immobilized oligonucleotides. Positive signals were detected with an avidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and chemiluminescent substrate. Thus, in a single hybridization reaction, a patient sample could be analyzed for a large number of mutations simultaneously. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from four patients did not contain any of the tested mutations and therefore were sequenced. Three additional candidate missense mutations, two of them novel, were identified: Arg(834)→-Gln in one patient, Gly(846)→Arg in one patient, and Val(902)→Glu in three ostensibly unrelated patients. By ASO hybridization, the mutations were confirmed in the affected patients and excluded in unaffected relatives and 50 normal controls. In one family, the Val(902)→Glu mutation was shown to be a de novo mutation. This rapid screening method is applicable to other subtypes of vWD for which mutations have been identified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)830-836
Number of pages7
JournalBlood
Volume82
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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