Idiopathic deep venous thrombosis and epicardial fat thickness: The age, gender and obesity connection

Gianluigi Mazzoccoli, Mariangela Pia Dagostino, Massimo Grilli, Massimiliano Copetti, Andrea Fontana, Fabio Pellegrini, Antonio Greco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Epicardial fat (EF) reflects abdominal visceral adiposity and visceral fat plays an important role in the development of an unfavorable cardiometabolic risk profile. Echocardiographic assessment of EF is considered a valuable method to assess visceral adipose tissue. An increased cardiovascular risk has been evidenced in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). In this study we have evaluated the amount of EF in patients with DVT. Patients and methods: We have analyzed the EF on a population of 77 subjects with the same atherosclerosis risk factors, 38 without idiopathic DVT (mean age 65.95 ± 16.29 years) and 39 with idiopathic DVT (mean age 65.49 ± 17.22 years). Results: Subjects with DVT showed a statistically significant increase of EF thickness (12.32 ± 1.73 mm vs. 9.07 ± 1.89 mm, p <0.0001). Univariate linear regression analyses evidenced that EF correlated positively with venous thombosis (p <0.001), age (p <0.001), obesity (p = 0.003), dyslipidemia (p = 0.01), arterial hypertension (p =0.047) and multivariate linear regression models showed that EF correlated positively with venous thrombosis (p <0.001), age (p <0.001), male gender (p = 0.025) and obesity (p <0.001). Conclusion: The data presented indicate that subjects with spontaneous DVT have an increased amount of EF, a reliable indicator of abdominal visceral adiposity and a marker of unfavorable metabolic and cardiovascular risk profile.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-178
Number of pages4
JournalBiomedicine and Aging Pathology
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

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Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular risk
  • Epicardial fat
  • Venous thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Ageing

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