"If two witches would watch two watches, which witch would watch which watch?" tDCS over the left frontal region modulates tongue twister repetition in healthy subjects

V. Fiori, S. Cipollari, C. Caltagirone, P. Marangolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates cortical activity in the human brain. In the language domain, it has already been shown that during a naming task tDCS reduces vocal reaction times in healthy individuals and speeds up the recovery process in left brain-damaged aphasic subjects. In this study, we wondered whether tDCS would influence the ability to articulate tongue twisters during a repetition task. Three groups of 10 healthy individuals were asked to repeat a list of tongue twisters in three different stimulation conditions: one group performed the task during anodal tDCS (atDCS) (20. min, 2. mA) over the left frontal region; a second group during cathodal tDCS delivered over the same region; and, in a third group, sham stimulation was applied. Accuracy and vocal reaction times in repeating each tongue twister before, during and 1. h after the stimulation were recorded. Participants were more accurate and faster at repeating the stimuli during atDCS than at baseline, while cathodal tDCS significantly reduced their performance in terms of accuracy and reaction times. No significant differences were observed among the three time points during the sham condition.We believe that these data clearly confirm that the left frontal region is critically involved in the process of speech repetition. They are also in line with recent evidence suggesting that frontal tDCS might be used as a therapeutic tool in patients suffering from articulatory deficits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-200
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience
Volume256
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 3 2014

Fingerprint

Tongue
Healthy Volunteers
Reaction Time
Aptitude
Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation
Brain
Human Activities
Language

Keywords

  • Articulation
  • Frontal region
  • Language recovery
  • Repetition
  • TDCS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Recent studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates cortical activity in the human brain. In the language domain, it has already been shown that during a naming task tDCS reduces vocal reaction times in healthy individuals and speeds up the recovery process in left brain-damaged aphasic subjects. In this study, we wondered whether tDCS would influence the ability to articulate tongue twisters during a repetition task. Three groups of 10 healthy individuals were asked to repeat a list of tongue twisters in three different stimulation conditions: one group performed the task during anodal tDCS (atDCS) (20. min, 2. mA) over the left frontal region; a second group during cathodal tDCS delivered over the same region; and, in a third group, sham stimulation was applied. Accuracy and vocal reaction times in repeating each tongue twister before, during and 1. h after the stimulation were recorded. Participants were more accurate and faster at repeating the stimuli during atDCS than at baseline, while cathodal tDCS significantly reduced their performance in terms of accuracy and reaction times. No significant differences were observed among the three time points during the sham condition.We believe that these data clearly confirm that the left frontal region is critically involved in the process of speech repetition. They are also in line with recent evidence suggesting that frontal tDCS might be used as a therapeutic tool in patients suffering from articulatory deficits.",
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AU - Marangolo, P.

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