IgA anti-transglutaminase autoantibodies at type 1 diabetes onset are less frequent in adult patients and are associated with a general celiac-specific lower immune response in comparison with nondiabetic celiac patients at diagnosis

Claudio Tiberti, Francesca Panimolle, Margherita Bonamico, Blegina Shashaj, Tiziana Filardi, Federica Lucantoni, Raffaella Nenna, Francesco Costantino, Andrea Lenzi, Susanna Morano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the celiac-associated humoral autoimmunity in child, adolescent, and adult patients at type 1 diabetes (DM1) onset and to determine whether DM1 celiac-specific humoral immunoreactivity occurs similarly to that in nondiabetic patients at celiac disease (CD) diagnosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - IgA anti-transglutaminase autoantibody (IgAtTGAb) was detected in 654 new-onset DM1 sera. IgA-tTGAb+ DM1 sera were subsequently analyzed for IgG-tTG, deamidated gliadin (DGP), and actin antibodies, and results were compared with those found in 83 screen-detected nondiabetic patients at CD diagnosis. RESULTS - A total of 12.8% DM1 sera were IgA-tTGAb+, with a lower autoantibody frequency in adult patients aged >18 years (6.8 vs. 15.1%, aged ≤18 years; P = 0.005). IgA-tTGAb titers, IgG-tTGAb, and DGPAb frequency/titers and mean number of celiac-autoantibody positivities per patient were significantly lower in IgA-tTGAb+ DM1 compared with nondiabetic CD patients. CONCLUSIONS - Age of diabetes onset is negatively associated with risk of CD. The celiac-specific humoral immunoreactivity at DM1 onset is significantly lower compared with that found in nondiabetic patients at CD diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2083-2085
Number of pages3
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume35
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

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