IGF-1 and atherothrombosis: Relevance to pathophysiology and therapy

Elena Conti, Maria Beatrice Musumeci, Marco De Giusti, Eleonora Dito, Vittoria Mastromarino, Camillo Autore, Massimo Volpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) plays a unique role in the cell protection of multiple systems, where its fine-tuned signal transduction helps to preserve tissues from hypoxia, ischaemia and oxidative stress, thus mediating functional homoeostatic adjustments. In contrast, its deprivation results in apoptosis and dysfunction. Many prospective epidemiological surveys have associated low IGF-1 levels with late mortality, MI (myocardial infarction), HF (heart failure) and diabetes. Interventional studies suggest that IGF-1 has anti-atherogenic actions, owing to its multifaceted impact on cardiovascular risk factors and diseases. The metabolic ability of IGF-1 in coupling vasodilation with improved function plays a key role in these actions. The endothelial-protective, anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic activities of IGF-1 exert critical effects in preventing both vascular damage and mechanisms that lead to unstable coronary plaques and syndromes. The pro-survival and anti-inflammatory short-term properties of IGF-1 appear to reduce infarct size and improve LV (left ventricular) remodelling after MI. An immune-modulatory ability, which is able to suppress 'friendly fire' and autoreactivity, is a proposed important additional mechanism explaining the anti-thrombotic and anti-remodelling activities of IGF-1. The concern of cancer risk raised by long-term therapy with IGF-1, however, deserves further study. In the present review, we discuss the large body of published evidence and review data on rhIGF-1 (recombinant human IGF-1) administration in cardiovascular disease and diabetes, with a focus on dosage and safety issues. Perhaps the time has come for the regenerative properties of IGF-1 to be assessed as a new pharmacological tool in cardiovascular medicine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-402
Number of pages26
JournalClinical Science
Volume120
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Somatomedins
Therapeutics
Myocardial Infarction
Ventricular Remodeling
Cytoprotection
Vasodilation
Blood Vessels
Signal Transduction
Oxidative Stress
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Cardiovascular Diseases
Blood Platelets
Ischemia
Heart Failure
Medicine
Pharmacology
Apoptosis
Safety
Survival
Mortality

Keywords

  • Atherothrombosis
  • Chronic renal failure
  • Diabetes
  • Endothelium
  • Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (rh-IGF-1)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Conti, E., Musumeci, M. B., De Giusti, M., Dito, E., Mastromarino, V., Autore, C., & Volpe, M. (2011). IGF-1 and atherothrombosis: Relevance to pathophysiology and therapy. Clinical Science, 120(9), 377-402. https://doi.org/10.1042/CS20100400

IGF-1 and atherothrombosis : Relevance to pathophysiology and therapy. / Conti, Elena; Musumeci, Maria Beatrice; De Giusti, Marco; Dito, Eleonora; Mastromarino, Vittoria; Autore, Camillo; Volpe, Massimo.

In: Clinical Science, Vol. 120, No. 9, 05.2011, p. 377-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Conti, E, Musumeci, MB, De Giusti, M, Dito, E, Mastromarino, V, Autore, C & Volpe, M 2011, 'IGF-1 and atherothrombosis: Relevance to pathophysiology and therapy', Clinical Science, vol. 120, no. 9, pp. 377-402. https://doi.org/10.1042/CS20100400
Conti E, Musumeci MB, De Giusti M, Dito E, Mastromarino V, Autore C et al. IGF-1 and atherothrombosis: Relevance to pathophysiology and therapy. Clinical Science. 2011 May;120(9):377-402. https://doi.org/10.1042/CS20100400
Conti, Elena ; Musumeci, Maria Beatrice ; De Giusti, Marco ; Dito, Eleonora ; Mastromarino, Vittoria ; Autore, Camillo ; Volpe, Massimo. / IGF-1 and atherothrombosis : Relevance to pathophysiology and therapy. In: Clinical Science. 2011 ; Vol. 120, No. 9. pp. 377-402.
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