Imaging findings in seven cases of congenital infantile myofibromatosis with cerebral, spinal, or head and neck involvement

Laura Holzer-Fruehwald, Susan Blaser, Andrea Rossi, Julia Fruehwald-Pallamar, Majda M. Thurnher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Congenital infantile myofibromatosis (IM) is a rare mesenchymal disease, presenting with tumors in the skin, muscle, viscera, bone, and subcutaneous tissue. It can present as (a) a solitary form with subcutaneous, erythematous nodules, (b) a multicentric form with subcutaneous, muscle, and/or bony lesions, and (c) a multicentric form with visceral involvement. Cerebral or spinal involvement in myofibromatosis has been reported rarely. Methods: We report seven cases of histology-proven infantile myofibromatosis with brain, spine, and/or head and neck involvement. Results: In three patients with multiple subcutaneous nodules, a multicentric form of IM with visceral involvement was diagnosed. In three patients, a multicentric form without visceral involvement was found. Two patients had brain involvement, and four patients had vertebral body involvement. Conclusion: In a newborn presenting with intraparenchymal brain lesions, epidural spinal masses, and/or vertebra plana or lytic lesions of the calvarium and spine, infantile myofibromatosis should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis. The presence of subcutaneous or muscular nodules facilitates the diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1389-1398
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroradiology
Volume54
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Neck
Head
Spine
Brain
Myofibromatosis
Muscles
Temazepam
Viscera
Subcutaneous Tissue
Rare Diseases
Skull
Histology
Differential Diagnosis
Newborn Infant
Bone and Bones
Skin
Congenital Generalized Fibromatosis
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Infantile myofibromatosis
  • Myofibroma
  • Spine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Imaging findings in seven cases of congenital infantile myofibromatosis with cerebral, spinal, or head and neck involvement. / Holzer-Fruehwald, Laura; Blaser, Susan; Rossi, Andrea; Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia; Thurnher, Majda M.

In: Neuroradiology, Vol. 54, No. 12, 2012, p. 1389-1398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holzer-Fruehwald, Laura ; Blaser, Susan ; Rossi, Andrea ; Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia ; Thurnher, Majda M. / Imaging findings in seven cases of congenital infantile myofibromatosis with cerebral, spinal, or head and neck involvement. In: Neuroradiology. 2012 ; Vol. 54, No. 12. pp. 1389-1398.
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