Immunoadsorption in patients with autoimmune ion channel disorders of the peripheral nervous system

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Autoimmune ion channel disorders of the peripheral nervous system include myasthenia gravis, the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, acquired neuromyotonia and autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathies. These disorders are characterized by the common feature of being mediated by IgG autoantibodies against identified target antigens, i.e. the acetylcholine receptor, the voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels, and the neuronal acetylcholine receptor. Moreover, experimental animal models have been identified for these diseases that respond to immunotherapy and are improved by plasmapheresis. On this basis, autoimmune ion channel disorders represent the ideal candidate for therapeutic apheresis. Immunoadsorption can be the treatment of choice when intensive apheretic protocols or long-term treatments must be performed, in patients needing frequent apheresis to keep a stable clinical condition, in case of unresponsiveness to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive treatments, or failure with TPE or intravenous immunoglobulins, and in patients with severe contraindications to long-term corticosteroids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-222
Number of pages4
JournalAtherosclerosis Supplements
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine

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