Impact of blood pressure control and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy on new-onset microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes: A post hoc analysis of the BENEDICT trial

Piero Ruggenenti, Annalisa Perna, Maria Ganeva, Bogdan Ene-Iordache, Giuseppe Remuzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

For assessment of the independent renoprotective effect of BP control and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) therapy, the relationships of baseline BP, BP reduction, and follow-up BP with the incidence of persistent microalbuminuria were evaluated in 1204 hypertensive patients who had type 2 diabetes and normoalbuminuria and were included in the BErgamo Nephrologic Diabetic Complications Trial (BENEDICT) study and were randomly assigned to 3.6 yr of treatment with the ACEi trandolapril (2 mg/d), the nondihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (ndCCB) verapamil SR (240 mg/d), their fixed combination Veratran (trandolapril 2 mg/d plus verapamil SR 180 mg/d), or placebo, plus other antihypertensive medications targeted at systolic/diastolic BP <130/80 mmHg. Follow-up (from month 3 to study end) systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse BP and their reductions versus baseline - but not baseline BP - independently predicted (P <0.001) the risk for microalbuminuria. In patients with follow-up BP above medians, ACEi significantly reduced the risk for microalbuminuria to levels that were observed among patients with BP below medians, regardless of ACEi treatment. The same trend was observed among patients with BP reductions below medians. ndCCB therapy did not independently affect microalbuminuria. Patients who were on Veratran had lower BP and less frequently received diuretics, β blockers, or dihydropyridine dCCB. In hypertensive, normoalbuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes, BP reduction and ACEi therapy both independently may prevent microalbuminuria. ACEi therapy is particularly effective when BP is poorly controlled, whereas ndCCB therapy is ineffective at any level of achieved BP. As compared with trandolapril, Veratran may help with achievement of target BP with less need for concomitant antihypertensive medications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3472-3481
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume17
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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