Impact of enteral nutrition on intestinal bacterial translocation and mortality in burned mice

M. Braga, L. Gianotti, E. Costantini, A. Di Francesco, C. Socci, G. Paganelli, C. Ossi, V. Di Carlo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of these experiments was to study the effect of early enteral nutrition with either standard or enriched (arginine, n-3 fatty acids, RNA) enteral formulas on translocation of bacteria from the gut and acute mortality rate following thermal injury. In the first experiment 60 Balb c mice were gavaged with 1010 Escherichia coli and received a 20% burn injury. In 40 mice enteral nutrition (20 standard, 20 enriched) was started immediately after injury and stopped 36 h later. In the control group (n = 20) aliquotes of Ringer's solution was administered intragastrically. Mortality rate was observed for 10 days post-injury. In the second experiment 60 Balb c mice were gavaged with 1010 E. coli labelled with biotin111 Indium and then burned. In 40 mice enteral nutrition (20 standard, 20 enriched) was started immediately after burn. The control group (n = 20) received aliquotes of Ringer's solution. 4 h after injury all animals were sacrificed and liver, lungs, kidneys, spleen and systemic blood were harvested, and radionuclide counts were measured. No animal died after day 3 post-burn. The mortality rate was significantly lower at day 1 in the groups infused with both enteral solutions (15%) compared to controls (30%; p = 0.05). At day 3 the animals fed with the enriched diets showed a lower mortality (5%) versus the standard and control groups (10%). Bacterial translocation to the liver and lungs was significantly higher in Ringer's group than in both enterally fed groups. Early post-burn enteral nutrition reduces both translocation and acute mortality. Supplementation of the diets with specific nutrients appears to exert additional advantages on outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-261
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Nutrition
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Gastroenterology
  • Health Professions(all)

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