Impact of involvement of individual joint groups on subdimensions of functional ability scales in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Silvia Meiorin, Giovanni Filocamo, Angela Pistorio, Silvia Magni-Manzoni, Flavio Sztajnbok, Adriana Cespedes-Cruz, Alessandra Magnani, Nicolino Ruperto, Alberto Martini, Angelo Ravelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the influence of arthritis in individual joint groups on subdimensions of functional ability questionnaires in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: 206 patients were included who had the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (C-HAQ) and the Juvenile Arthritis Functionality Scale (JAFS) completed simultaneously by a parent and received a detailed joint assessment. In each patient, joint involvement (defined as presence of swelling, pain on motion/tenderness and/or restricted motion) was classified in 3 topographic patterns: Pattern 1 (hip, knee, ankle, subtalar and foot joints); Pattern 2 (wrist and hand joints); Pattern 3 (elbow, shoulder, cervical spine and temporomandibular joints). Frequency of reported disability in each instrument subdimension was evaluated for each joint pattern, present either isolatedly or in mixed form. Results: Among patients with Pattern 1, the JAFS revealed the greatest ability to capture and discriminate functional limitation, whereas impairment in the C-HAQ was more diluted across several subdimensions. Both C-HAQ and JAFS appeared to be less reliable in detecting functional impairment in the hand and wrist (Pattern 2) than in other body areas. Overall, the JAFS revealed a superior ability to discriminate the relative functional impact of impairment in individual joint groups among patients with mixed joint patterns. Conclusion: In children with JIA, a functional measure focused to assess the function of individual joint groups (the JAFS) may detect with greater precision the functional impact of arthritis in specific body areas than does a standard questionnaire based on the assessment of activities of daily living (the C-HAQ).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)527-533
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Experimental Rheumatology
Volume27
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - May 2009

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Aptitude
Juvenile Arthritis
Joints
Health
Arthritis
Foot Joints
Hand Joints
Subtalar Joint
Wrist Joint
Ankle Joint
Temporomandibular Joint
Hip Joint
Activities of Daily Living
Elbow
Knee Joint
Wrist
Surveys and Questionnaires
Spine
Hand
Pain

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Functional assessment
  • Health outcomes
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Impact of involvement of individual joint groups on subdimensions of functional ability scales in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. / Meiorin, Silvia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Pistorio, Angela; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Sztajnbok, Flavio; Cespedes-Cruz, Adriana; Magnani, Alessandra; Ruperto, Nicolino; Martini, Alberto; Ravelli, Angelo.

In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, Vol. 27, No. 3, 05.2009, p. 527-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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