Impaired cortical deactivation during hand movement in the relapsing phase of multiple sclerosis: A cross-sectional and longitudinal fMRI study

Patrizia Pantano, Silvia Bernardi, Emanuele Tinelli, Simona Pontecorvo, Delia Lenzi, Eytan Raz, Francesca Tona, Claudio Gasperini, Carlo Pozzilli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the cortical activation changes during clinical relapses in multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: To assess cross-sectional and longitudinal differences in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) cortical patterns between the relapsing and stable phases of MS.Methods: We studied 32 patients with relapsing-remitting MS with mild disability: 19 within 48 h of symptom onset of a new relapse (G1) and 13 in the stable phase, relapse-free for at least 6 months (G2). All patients underwent fMRI twice, upon entry (time 1) and 30-50 days later (time 2), during right-hand movement.Results: No between-group differences were observed in age, disability or T2 lesion load. Between-group analysis showed a significant difference in the ipsilateral precentral gyrus (IPG) activation at time 1. Activity differences in the IPG expressed reduced deactivation in G1 compared with G2. Longitudinal changes in brain activity in the IPG were significantly greater in G1 than G2. G1 patients with a slow clinical recovery (n = 8) showed different activity at baseline and greater activity changes over time in the IPG than patients with a fast recovery (n = 11).Conclusion: This study shows that the relapsing phase is associated with reduced brain deactivation in the IPG, which is more marked in patients with a slow clinical recovery. Increased cortical excitability associated with inflammation may determine functional modifications within the ipsilateral motor area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1177-1184
Number of pages8
JournalMultiple Sclerosis Journal
Volume17
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Frontal Lobe
Multiple Sclerosis
Hand
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Recurrence
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Motor Cortex
Brain
Inflammation

Keywords

  • deactivation
  • fMRI
  • ipsilateral precentral gyrus
  • motor cortex
  • multiple sclerosis
  • relapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Impaired cortical deactivation during hand movement in the relapsing phase of multiple sclerosis : A cross-sectional and longitudinal fMRI study. / Pantano, Patrizia; Bernardi, Silvia; Tinelli, Emanuele; Pontecorvo, Simona; Lenzi, Delia; Raz, Eytan; Tona, Francesca; Gasperini, Claudio; Pozzilli, Carlo.

In: Multiple Sclerosis Journal, Vol. 17, No. 10, 2011, p. 1177-1184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pantano, Patrizia ; Bernardi, Silvia ; Tinelli, Emanuele ; Pontecorvo, Simona ; Lenzi, Delia ; Raz, Eytan ; Tona, Francesca ; Gasperini, Claudio ; Pozzilli, Carlo. / Impaired cortical deactivation during hand movement in the relapsing phase of multiple sclerosis : A cross-sectional and longitudinal fMRI study. In: Multiple Sclerosis Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 17, No. 10. pp. 1177-1184.
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