Implementation of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to the specimens flow in a population-based colorectal cancer screening programme using immunochemical faecal occult blood tests: a quality improvement project in the Milan colorectal cancer screening programme

Silvia Deandrea, Enrica Tidone, Aldo Bellini, Luigi Bisanti, Nico Gerardo Leonardo, Anna Rita Silvestri, Dario Consonni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A multidisciplinary working group applied the Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) approach to the flow of kits and specimens for the first-level test of a colorectal cancer screening programme using immunochemical faecal occult blood tests.

Methods: HFMEA comprised four steps: (1) identification and mapping of the process steps (subprocesses); (2) analysis of failure modes and calculation of the risk priority numbers (RPNs); (3) identification of corrective actions; and (4) follow-up and evaluation of corrective actions.

Results: The team identified 9 main failure modes, 12 effects and 34 associated causes. RPN scores ranged from 2 to 96. Failure modes within the first five positions in the ranking list ordered by RPN concerned: 'degraded haemoglobin in the specimen', 'mixed-up kits' and 'anonymous specimen'. All of these could lead to false-negative results and/or subjects with positive tests not being recalled for assessment. The team planned corrective actions for those failure modes. As a result, the follow-up of corrective actions showed a significant decrease in the proportion of anonymous kits from 11.6 to 4.8 per 1000 (relative reduction of 59%). The HFMEA exercise led to a reduction in: missed positive tests; missed cancer and high-risk adenomas; complaints about the communication of test results to a person who never did the test; and false-negative results due either to haemoglobin degradation or an expired sampling tube.

Conclusions: HFMEA is a useful tool for reducing errors in colorectal cancer screening programmes using faecal occult blood tests and is characterised by a straightforward interpretation of results and ease of communication to healthcare managers and decision makers.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere000299
JournalBMJ open quality
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Occult Blood
Hematologic Tests
Quality Improvement
Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Population
Hemoglobins
Adenoma
Delivery of Health Care
Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis
Neoplasms

Cite this

Implementation of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to the specimens flow in a population-based colorectal cancer screening programme using immunochemical faecal occult blood tests : a quality improvement project in the Milan colorectal cancer screening programme. / Deandrea, Silvia; Tidone, Enrica; Bellini, Aldo; Bisanti, Luigi; Leonardo, Nico Gerardo; Silvestri, Anna Rita; Consonni, Dario.

In: BMJ open quality, Vol. 7, No. 1, e000299, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: A multidisciplinary working group applied the Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) approach to the flow of kits and specimens for the first-level test of a colorectal cancer screening programme using immunochemical faecal occult blood tests.Methods: HFMEA comprised four steps: (1) identification and mapping of the process steps (subprocesses); (2) analysis of failure modes and calculation of the risk priority numbers (RPNs); (3) identification of corrective actions; and (4) follow-up and evaluation of corrective actions.Results: The team identified 9 main failure modes, 12 effects and 34 associated causes. RPN scores ranged from 2 to 96. Failure modes within the first five positions in the ranking list ordered by RPN concerned: 'degraded haemoglobin in the specimen', 'mixed-up kits' and 'anonymous specimen'. All of these could lead to false-negative results and/or subjects with positive tests not being recalled for assessment. The team planned corrective actions for those failure modes. As a result, the follow-up of corrective actions showed a significant decrease in the proportion of anonymous kits from 11.6 to 4.8 per 1000 (relative reduction of 59{\%}). The HFMEA exercise led to a reduction in: missed positive tests; missed cancer and high-risk adenomas; complaints about the communication of test results to a person who never did the test; and false-negative results due either to haemoglobin degradation or an expired sampling tube.Conclusions: HFMEA is a useful tool for reducing errors in colorectal cancer screening programmes using faecal occult blood tests and is characterised by a straightforward interpretation of results and ease of communication to healthcare managers and decision makers.",
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