In-hospital death according to dementia diagnosis in acutely ill elderly patients: The REPOSI study

A. Marengoni, S. Corrao, A. Nobili, M. Tettamanti, L. Pasina, F. Salerno, A. Iorio, M. Marcucci, F. Bonometti, P. M. Mannucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The aim of the study was to explore the association of dementia with in-hospital death in acutely ill medical patients. Methods Thirty-four internal medicine and 4 geriatric wards in Italy participated in the Registro Politerapie SIMI-REPOSI-study during 2008. One thousand three hundred and thirty two in-patients aged 65 years or older were enrolled. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of dementia with in-hospital death. Socio-demographic characteristics, morbidity (single diseases and the Charlson Index), number of drugs, and adverse clinical events during hospitalization were considered as potential confounders. Results One hundred and seventeen participants were diagnosed as being affected by dementia. Patients with dementia were more likely to be women, older, to have cerebrovascular diseases, pneumonia, and a higher number of adverse clinical events during hospitalization. The percentage of patients affected by dementia who died during hospitalization was higher than that of patients without dementia (9.4 versus 4.9%). After multiadjustment, the diagnosis of dementia was associated with in-hospital death (OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.0-4.5). Having dementia and at least one adverse clinical event during hospitalization showed an additive effect on in-hospital mortality (OR = 20.7; 95% CI = 6.9-61.9). Conclusions Acutely ill elderly patients affected by dementia are more likely to die shortly after hospital admission. Having dementia and adverse clinical events during hospital stay increases the risk of death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)930-936
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

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Dementia
Hospitalization
Logistic Models
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Internal Medicine
Hospital Mortality
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Geriatrics
Italy
Length of Stay
Pneumonia
Demography
Morbidity

Keywords

  • acute illnesses
  • dementia
  • hospitalization
  • mortality
  • older patients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

In-hospital death according to dementia diagnosis in acutely ill elderly patients : The REPOSI study. / Marengoni, A.; Corrao, S.; Nobili, A.; Tettamanti, M.; Pasina, L.; Salerno, F.; Iorio, A.; Marcucci, M.; Bonometti, F.; Mannucci, P. M.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 9, 09.2011, p. 930-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective The aim of the study was to explore the association of dementia with in-hospital death in acutely ill medical patients. Methods Thirty-four internal medicine and 4 geriatric wards in Italy participated in the Registro Politerapie SIMI-REPOSI-study during 2008. One thousand three hundred and thirty two in-patients aged 65 years or older were enrolled. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of dementia with in-hospital death. Socio-demographic characteristics, morbidity (single diseases and the Charlson Index), number of drugs, and adverse clinical events during hospitalization were considered as potential confounders. Results One hundred and seventeen participants were diagnosed as being affected by dementia. Patients with dementia were more likely to be women, older, to have cerebrovascular diseases, pneumonia, and a higher number of adverse clinical events during hospitalization. The percentage of patients affected by dementia who died during hospitalization was higher than that of patients without dementia (9.4 versus 4.9{\%}). After multiadjustment, the diagnosis of dementia was associated with in-hospital death (OR = 2.1; 95{\%} CI = 1.0-4.5). Having dementia and at least one adverse clinical event during hospitalization showed an additive effect on in-hospital mortality (OR = 20.7; 95{\%} CI = 6.9-61.9). Conclusions Acutely ill elderly patients affected by dementia are more likely to die shortly after hospital admission. Having dementia and adverse clinical events during hospital stay increases the risk of death.",
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