In silico and in vivo analysis of IL37 in multiple sclerosis reveals its probable homeostatic role on the clinical activity, disability, and treatment with fingolimod

Eugenio Cavalli, Emanuela Mazzon, Maria Sofia Basile, Santa Mammana, Manuela Pennisi, Paolo Fagone, Reni Kalfin, Vanja Martinovic, Jovana Ivanovic, Marko Andabaka, Sarlota Mesaros, Tatjana Pekmezovic, Jelena Drulovic, Ferdinando Nicoletti, Maria Cristina Petralia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We evaluated the in silico expression and circulating levels of interleukin (IL)37 in patients with different forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and also upon treatment with different disease-modifying drugs. The combined interpretation of the resulting data strengthens and extends the current emerging concept that endogenous IL37 plays an important role in determining onset and progression of MS. The in silico analysis revealed that production of IL37 from cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells from MS patients was reduced in vitro as compared to healthy controls. The analysis of the datasets also demonstrated that "higher" levels of IL37 production from PBMC entailed significant protection from MS relapses. In addition, the in vivo part of the study showed that IL37 was selectively augmented in the sera of MS patients during a relapse and that treatment with the high potency disease-modifying drug fingolimod significantly increased the frequency of patients with circulating blood levels of IL37 (6/9, 66%) as compared to patients receiving no treatment (n = 48) or platform therapy (n = 59) who had levels of IL37 below the limit of the sensitivity of the assay. This finding therefore anticipates that fingolimod may at least partially exert its beneficial effects in MS by upregulating the production of IL37.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20
JournalMolecules
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 19 2019

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • Fingolimod
  • Interleukin 37
  • Multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

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