In vitro effects of IL-12 and IL-2 on NK cells, cytokine release and clonogenic activity in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)

B. Sarina, A. Cortelezzi, C. Cattaneo, M. Pomati, I. Silvestris, M. Di Stefano, D. Lambertenghi-Deliliers, C. Hu, M. Monza, A. T. Maiolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We evaluated the in vitro effects of IL-12, alone and in association with IL-2 on MDS bone marrow and peripheral blood cells. Thirty-six patients and 14 healthy subjects were studied. Natural killer-activity (NK-a) levels and lymphocyte immunophenotypes were determined in fresh bone marrow (BMMNC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC), which then were resuspended in medium containing IL-2, IL-12 or IL-2 + IL-12 for 7 days. Re-evaluation of NK-a levels, lymphocyte immunophenotypes, clonogenic activity and cytokine release showed that, unlike IL-2, IL-12 did not significantly increase NK-a or CD3-/56+ cell levels in either bone marrow or peripheral blood; IL-2 + 12 led to a significant increase that fell between the values reached by each cytokine alone. IL-2 + 12 and, although to a lesser extent, also IL-12 alone induced the release of large amounts of γ-IFN and α-TNF. In addition, the number of clusters particularly decreased in the samples treated with IL-2 + 12 and IL-12 alone. Clonogenic activity was not modified after stimulation with any of the treatment. These data suggest that IL-12 induces the release of inhibitory cytokines in normal as well as MDS cells and that it could be used in patients with elevated bone marrow blastosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1726-1731
Number of pages6
JournalLeukemia
Volume11
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 1997

Keywords

  • Clonogenic activity
  • Interleukin-12
  • Interleukin-2
  • Myelodysplastic syndromes
  • NK activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Cancer Research

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