In vitro modulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release in human pancreatic islets

S. Marzorati, R. Melzi, R. Nano, B. Antonioli, V. Di Carlo, L. Piemonti, F. Bertuzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Islet transplantation is a new approach to treat type 1 diabetic patients. Despite its great potential and progressively increasing success rate, islet engrafment still represents an unsolved problem. Only part of the transplanted β-cell mass survives after infusion due to hypoxia and inflammatory reactions, principally mediated by macrophages. We have demonstrated that human islets release monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), one of the most powerful macrophage chemokines, which may impair the fate of a transplant. In this study we have attempted to modulate in vitro MCP-1 release by human islets. Human islets isolated using the automated method were cultured in CMRL or M199 standard culture media alone or supplemented with (1) two intracellular kinase inhibitors (10 μmol/L RO8220, a protein kinase C inhibitor, and rcAMP 20 μmol/L, a protein kinase A inhibitor) or (2) two antioxidant and cell-protective agents (vitamin E, vitamin B); or (3) immunosuppressive drugs (0.001 to 10 ng/mL cyclosporine, 0.1 to 100 ng/mL rapamycin, 0.1 to 10 ng/mL tacrolimus, 0.001 to 10 ng/mL mycophenolate acid). We observed that the only culture condition that significantly decreased MCP-1 in human islets were CMRL (31 ± 12 in CMRL vs 539 ± 184 pg/mL, in M199, P <.05) or cyclosporine (514 ± 83 pg/mL in control islet vs 307 ± 13, 231 ± 44, 192 ± 4, 242 ± 113, 169 ± 15 pg/mL in islet plus cyclosporine ranging from 0.001 to 10 ng/mL, respectively, P > .05). The capacity of in vitro factors to decrease human islet MCP-1 release suggests strategies to increase the success of islet transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)607-608
Number of pages2
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

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Chemokine CCL2
Islets of Langerhans
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Protein Kinase Inhibitors
Macrophages
Protective Agents
Vitamin B Complex
Protein C Inhibitor
Tacrolimus
Sirolimus
Immunosuppressive Agents
Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases
Vitamin E
Chemokines
Protein Kinase C
Cyclosporine
Culture Media
Phosphotransferases
Antioxidants
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

In vitro modulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release in human pancreatic islets. / Marzorati, S.; Melzi, R.; Nano, R.; Antonioli, B.; Di Carlo, V.; Piemonti, L.; Bertuzzi, F.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 36, No. 3, 04.2004, p. 607-608.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marzorati, S. ; Melzi, R. ; Nano, R. ; Antonioli, B. ; Di Carlo, V. ; Piemonti, L. ; Bertuzzi, F. / In vitro modulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release in human pancreatic islets. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2004 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 607-608.
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