In vitro production of interleukin 1 by normal and malignant human B lymphocytes

V. Pistoia, F. Cozzolino, A. Rubartelli, M. Torcia, S. Roncella, M. Ferrarini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In this study, the capacity of normal and neoplastic B lymphocytes to release interleukin 1 (IL 1) has been investigated. Peripheral blood B cells from normal donors were isolated by depletion of E rosetting cells and by positive selection of cells expressing surface immunoglobulin (sIg) or the B1 marker. Peripheral blood B cells from patients with B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) were purified by removal of E rosetting cells followed by complement-mediated cytotoxicity with selected monoclonal antibodies. All of the normal B cell suspensions and the large majority of the B-CLL cells produced in culture high amounts of IL 1 in the absence of any apparent stimulus. Control experiments ruled out that small numbers of monocytes in the B cell suspensions could represent the source of IL 1. These data support the contention that B cells participate to the immune response as accessory cells for T cell activation not only by physically presenting antigen, but also by releasing IL 1.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1688-1692
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume136
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1986

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Interleukin-1
B-Lymphocytes
B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Blood Cells
Suspensions
B-Cell Antigen Receptors
In Vitro Techniques
Monocytes
Monoclonal Antibodies
Tissue Donors
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Pistoia, V., Cozzolino, F., Rubartelli, A., Torcia, M., Roncella, S., & Ferrarini, M. (1986). In vitro production of interleukin 1 by normal and malignant human B lymphocytes. Journal of Immunology, 136(5), 1688-1692.

In vitro production of interleukin 1 by normal and malignant human B lymphocytes. / Pistoia, V.; Cozzolino, F.; Rubartelli, A.; Torcia, M.; Roncella, S.; Ferrarini, M.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 136, No. 5, 1986, p. 1688-1692.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pistoia, V, Cozzolino, F, Rubartelli, A, Torcia, M, Roncella, S & Ferrarini, M 1986, 'In vitro production of interleukin 1 by normal and malignant human B lymphocytes', Journal of Immunology, vol. 136, no. 5, pp. 1688-1692.
Pistoia V, Cozzolino F, Rubartelli A, Torcia M, Roncella S, Ferrarini M. In vitro production of interleukin 1 by normal and malignant human B lymphocytes. Journal of Immunology. 1986;136(5):1688-1692.
Pistoia, V. ; Cozzolino, F. ; Rubartelli, A. ; Torcia, M. ; Roncella, S. ; Ferrarini, M. / In vitro production of interleukin 1 by normal and malignant human B lymphocytes. In: Journal of Immunology. 1986 ; Vol. 136, No. 5. pp. 1688-1692.
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