In vivo assessment of human brain oscillations during application of transcranial electric currents

Surjo R. Soekadar, Matthias Witkowski, Eliana G. Cossio, Niels Birbaumer, Stephen E. Robinson, Leonardo G. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain oscillations reflect pattern formation of cell assemblies' activity, which is often disturbed in neurological and psychiatric diseases like depression, schizophrenia and stroke. In the neurobiological analysis and treatment of these conditions, transcranial electric currents applied to the brain proved beneficial. However, the direct effects of these currents on brain oscillations have remained an enigma because of the inability to record them simultaneously. Here we report a novel strategy that resolves this problem. We describe accurate reconstructed localization of dipolar sources and changes of brain oscillatory activity associated with motor actions in primary cortical brain regions undergoing transcranial electric stimulation. This new method allows for the first time direct measurement of the effects of non-invasive electrical brain stimulation on brain oscillatory activity and behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2032
JournalNature Communications
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Electric currents
electric current
brain
Brain
oscillations
stimulation
Deep Brain Stimulation
schizophrenia
Electric Stimulation
Psychiatry
strokes
Schizophrenia
assemblies
Stroke
Depression
Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Soekadar, S. R., Witkowski, M., Cossio, E. G., Birbaumer, N., Robinson, S. E., & Cohen, L. G. (2013). In vivo assessment of human brain oscillations during application of transcranial electric currents. Nature Communications, 4, [2032]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms3032

In vivo assessment of human brain oscillations during application of transcranial electric currents. / Soekadar, Surjo R.; Witkowski, Matthias; Cossio, Eliana G.; Birbaumer, Niels; Robinson, Stephen E.; Cohen, Leonardo G.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 4, 2032, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soekadar, SR, Witkowski, M, Cossio, EG, Birbaumer, N, Robinson, SE & Cohen, LG 2013, 'In vivo assessment of human brain oscillations during application of transcranial electric currents', Nature Communications, vol. 4, 2032. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms3032
Soekadar, Surjo R. ; Witkowski, Matthias ; Cossio, Eliana G. ; Birbaumer, Niels ; Robinson, Stephen E. ; Cohen, Leonardo G. / In vivo assessment of human brain oscillations during application of transcranial electric currents. In: Nature Communications. 2013 ; Vol. 4.
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