In vivo stability of ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA). Is it a suitable carrier for radionuclides used in synovectomy?

Marco Chinol, Shankar Vallabhajosula, Joseph D. Zuckerman, Stanley J. Goldsmith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA) have been widely used as a carrier for several radionuclides used in radiation synovectomy. Different rates of extra-articular leakage of radioactivity have been observed with 90Y and 165Dy. In order to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the extra-articular leakage of radioactivity, the in vivo stability of FHMA carrier was studied. Following an injection of [59Fe]Fe-FHMA into the knees of normal rabbits, the cumulative leakage of [59Fe]Fe-FHMA was 2.9% at 5 days and 12.3% at 14 days. More than 60% of this activity was in the blood. But when FHMA was double labeled with 59Fe and 166Ho, the 59Fe leakage significantly increased to 18.5% at 5 days and 27% by 14 days. The instability of FHMA is accelerated when it is complexed with 166Ho and may be due to the "mass effect" of 166Ho or due to radiolysis induced by high energy β particles from 166Ho. These results suggest that FHMA is a suitable carrier only for the short lived radionuclides used in synovectomy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Applications and Instrumentation.
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990

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Radioisotopes
Radioactivity
Joints
ferric hydroxide
Knee
Radiation
Rabbits
Injections

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In vivo stability of ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA). Is it a suitable carrier for radionuclides used in synovectomy? / Chinol, Marco; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Zuckerman, Joseph D.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.

In: International Journal of Radiation Applications and Instrumentation., Vol. 17, No. 5, 1990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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