In vivo T lymphocyte origin of macrophage-tropic strains of HIV: Role of monocytes during in vitro isolation and in vivo infection

Ferdinand E. Massari, Guido Poli, Steven M. Schnittman, Miltiades C. Psallidopoulos, Victoria Davey, Anthony S. Fauci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Previously published isolation techniques with T cell blasts and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were used to recover HIV from the PBMC of a group of 23 asymptomatic seropositive individuals. Viral isolation was more readily accomplished by MDM coculture resulting in 9 isolates being obtained exclusively by this method (macrophage tropic strains). To determine the in vivo cellular source of these isolates we separated PBMC from 5 of these 9 patients into T lymphocyte and monocyte fractions by flow microfluorometry. These fractions were then analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of HIV-1 proviral DNA. In 4 out of these 5 patients HIV-1 proviral DNA could be detected exclusively in T lymphocytes but not in monocytes, although the virus could be isolated only by MDM coculture. In the remaining patient HIV could be amplified in both T lymphocytes and monocytes. Further phenotypic analysis revealed that, among T lymphocytes, only the CD4+ subset was infected with HIV. We conclude that among PBMC the most common in vivo source of HIV strains which preferentially infect macrophages in vitro is the CD4+ T lymphocyte. These data also suggest that the macrophage tropism characteristic of some HIV strains reflects predominantly an in vitro phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4628-4632
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume144
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Jun 15 1990

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Massari, F. E., Poli, G., Schnittman, S. M., Psallidopoulos, M. C., Davey, V., & Fauci, A. S. (1990). In vivo T lymphocyte origin of macrophage-tropic strains of HIV: Role of monocytes during in vitro isolation and in vivo infection. Journal of Immunology, 144(12), 4628-4632.