Inadequate dietary intake but not renal tubular acidosis is associated with bone demineralization in primary biliary cirrhosis

M. Allocca, A. Crosignani, A. Gritti, A. Benetti, M. Zuin, M. Podda, P. M. Battezzati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Metabolic bone disease associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is inadequately characterized. Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) may lead to bone loss through chronic mobilization of skeletal calcium salts to buffer increased acid load. Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of RTA in PBC and establish the relationships among bone mineral density (BMD), renal function and nutritional status. Methods: We enrolled 69 female patients with compensated PBC and 35 control patients with chronic hepatitis C. RTA was searched in all patients, and 24-h dietary recalls were collected at enrolment. BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the femur neck, lumbar spine and radius ultradistalis sites. Results: No patients received a diagnosis of RTA. BMD values (Z-scores) showed only little deviation from normal population with no difference between PBC and controls. Osteopoenic PBC patients (T-score <1) showed significantly lower daily phosphorus intake [median: 672 (288-1374) vs. 921 (253-1923) mg/day; P = 0.037], with a trend towards lower caloric intake than their nonosteopoenic counterparts. Conclusions: Renal tubular acidosis is uncommon in compensated PBC. Cholestasis is not associated with an increased risk of bone demineralization. Inadequate dietary intake may be a preventable factor contributing to bone loss in PBC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-227
Number of pages9
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

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Renal Tubular Acidosis
Biliary Liver Cirrhosis
Bone and Bones
Bone Density
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Cholestasis
Femur Neck
Photon Absorptiometry
Chronic Hepatitis C
Energy Intake
Nutritional Status
Phosphorus
Buffers
Spine
Salts
Calcium
Kidney
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Inadequate dietary intake but not renal tubular acidosis is associated with bone demineralization in primary biliary cirrhosis. / Allocca, M.; Crosignani, A.; Gritti, A.; Benetti, A.; Zuin, M.; Podda, M.; Battezzati, P. M.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.2007, p. 219-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Crosignani, A.

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AU - Zuin, M.

AU - Podda, M.

AU - Battezzati, P. M.

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