Inappropriate use of antiplatelet agents for primary prevention in nursing homes: An Italian multicenter observational study

Luca Pasina, Alessio Novella, Chiara Elli, Alessandro Nobili, Aladar Ianes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

AIM: The benefits of antiplatelets to prevent cardio- and cerebrovascular disease are recognized and appropriate only for "secondary prevention." This multicenter retrospective study was designed to (i) examine the prevalence of residents receiving antiplatelets for primary and secondary cardio- and cerebrovascular prevention, and (ii) evaluate the predictors of inappropriate antiplatelet prescription.

METHODS: This study was conducted in a sample of Italian long-term care nursing homes (NHs). Appropriate use of antiplatelets was defined in accordance with the strongest evidence-based indications.

RESULTS: Among the 2579 patients recruited from 27 long-term care NHs (age mean ± SD: 86.8 ± 7.3; women: 1995; 77.4%), 1092 were treated with antiplatelets (42.3%) and 619 (56.7%) were receiving antiplatelet agents for inappropriate primary prevention of cardio- or cerebrovascular atherothrombotic events. Age, dementia or cerebral atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes without chronic complication and hypertension were predictors of inappropriate prescription of antiplatelets. Patients inappropriately treated with antiplatelets also had a higher risk of receiving proton pump inhibitors than those appropriately not treated in univariate (OR 95% CI = 2.79 (2.25-3.46, p < 0.0001) and multivariate models (OR 95% CI 2.71 (2.16-3.40, p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS: Most patients receiving antiplatelet agents in NHs are being inappropriately treated for primary prevention of cardio- or cerebrovascular disease. NH residents with diagnosis of dementia or cerebral atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes without chronic complication and hypertension seemed more likely to receive antiplatelets inappropriately. Patients without an evidence-based indication for antiplatelets also received proton-pump inhibitors in an unnecessary "prescribing cascade," which should be assessed for de-prescribing. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020; 20: 828-832.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)828-832
Number of pages5
JournalGeriatrics and Gerontology International
Volume20
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Cerebrovascular Disorders
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Inappropriate Prescribing/statistics & numerical data
  • Italy
  • Long-Term Care/statistics & numerical data
  • Male
  • Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data
  • Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/administration & dosage
  • Primary Prevention/statistics & numerical data
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors/administration & dosage
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Secondary Prevention/statistics & numerical data

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