Incidence of cancer after a first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism treated with 3 months or 1 year of oral anticoagulation

M. R. Taliani, G. Agnelli, P. Prandoni, C. Becattini, M. Moia, M. Bazzan, W. Ageno, C. Tomasi, G. Guazzaloca, G. B. Ambrosio, A. Bertoldi, R. Salvi, R. Poggio, M. Silingardi, D. Imberti, F. Porro, P. Zonzin, F. Casazza, A. Bongarzoni, E. M. PoglianiF. Piovella, L. Ria, D. De Lucia, A. Piccioli, P. Bagatella, M. Frulla, L. Mosena, A. Girolami, A. Vaccarino, A. Squizzato, F. Dentali, L. Steidl, R. Parisi, M. Miccio, P. A. Pittaluga, A. Schenone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: A prolonged treatment with oral anticoagulants has been claimed to reduce the incidence of newly diagnosed cancer in the long-term follow-up of patients with venous thromboembolism. Objectives: In a multicenter prospective study we assessed the incidence of newly diagnosed clinically overt cancer in patients with a first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE) treated with oral anticoagulants for 3 months or 1 year. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients with an idiopathic venous thromboembolism who had completed 3 months of oral anticoagulant therapy without having a recurrence, bleeding or newly diagnosed cancer were randomized to discontinue oral anticoagulant therapy or to continue it for nine additional months. Idiopathic venous thromboembolism was defined as thrombosis occurring in the absence of known cancer, known thrombophilia, or temporary risk factors for venous thromboembolism. All patients were followed up for at least 1 year after randomization. Results: A total of 429 patients, 265 patients with DVT and 164 with PE, were followed up for an average of 43.7 months after randomization. A newly diagnosed cancer occurred in 32 patients (7.5%), 13 (6.2%) of the 210 patients treated for 3 months and 19 (8.7%) of the 219 patients treated for lyear (RR = 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.36-1.41). Conclusions: The incidence of newly diagnosed clinically overt cancer is not reduced in patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism treated with 1-year anticoagulant treatment compared with patients treated for 3 months.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1730-1733
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Volume1
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2003

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Deep venous thrombosis
  • Oral anticoagulants
  • Pulmonary embolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Medicine(all)

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