Incidence of colonization and bloodstream infection with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in children receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy in Italy

D. Caselli, S. Cesaro, F. Fagioli, F. Carraro, Ottavio Ziino, Giulio Andrea Zanazzo, Cristina Meazza, Antonella Colombini, Elio Castagnola, Paola Muggeo, Rossella Mura, M. G. Orofino, M. Giacchino, M. La Spina, Caterina Consarino, Fabio Tucci, Angelica Barone, M. Cellini, K. Perruccio, Roberto BandettiniR. Rondelli, S. De Masi, Maurizio Aricò

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Few data are available on the incidence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) infection or colonization in children receiving anticancer chemotherapy. We performed a nationwide survey among centers participating in the pediatric hematology-oncology cooperative study group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica, AIEOP). During a 2-year observation period, we observed a threefold increase in the colonization rate, and a fourfold increase of bloodstream infection episodes, caused by CPE, with a 90-day mortality of 14%. This first nationwide Italian pediatric survey shows that the circulation of CPE strains in the pediatric hematology-oncology environment is increasing. Given the mortality rate, which is higher than for other bacterial strains, specific monitoring should be applied and the results should have implications for health-care practice in pediatric hematology-oncology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-155
Number of pages4
JournalInfectious Diseases
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae
  • Children
  • Immunosuppression
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Microbiology (medical)

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