Increase in blood pressure reproducibility by repeated semi-automatic blood pressure measurements in the clinic environment

Giuseppe Mancia, Luisa Ulian, Gianfranco Parati, Silvia Trazzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate whether increasing the number of blood pressure readings obtained in the clinic environment increases the blood pressure reproducibility. Patients: Thirteen mild essential hypertensive patients studied in the outpatient clinics, following withdrawal of antihypertensive treatment for 4 weeks. Methods: The systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured three times, using a mercury sphygmomanometer, with the patient in the sitting position. Measurements were then performed with the patient in the lying position using an oscillometric device (SpaceLabs 90202 or 90207). The device was operated semi-automatically at 3-min intervals until 25 readings had been collected. The same procedure was repeated 4 weeks later. The systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were averaged by considering a progressively greater number of readings, from 1 to 25. The reciprocal of the standard deviation (1/SD) of the mean difference after 4 weeks was taken as the measure of reproducibility. Results: 1/SD increased progressively as the number of semi-automatic blood pressure readings from which the average was calculated increased. For a similar number of blood pressure readings the reproducibility was similar for semi-automatic readings to that for automatic readings obtained by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Conclusion: Multiple blood pressure readings obtained semi-automatical ly in the outpatient clinics increase blood pressure reproducibility and make the value similar to that obtained by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The advantage of an increase in reproducibility for studies on antihypertensive drugs thus depends on the number of readings, and can also be obtained by semi-automatic measurements in the clinic environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)469-473
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume12
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Blood Pressure
Reading
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Antihypertensive Agents
Sphygmomanometers
Equipment and Supplies
Mercury
Posture
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure
  • Antihypertensive drugs
  • Blood pressure measurement
  • Blood pressure reproducibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Increase in blood pressure reproducibility by repeated semi-automatic blood pressure measurements in the clinic environment. / Mancia, Giuseppe; Ulian, Luisa; Parati, Gianfranco; Trazzi, Silvia.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 12, No. 4, 1994, p. 469-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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