INCREASED BLINKING MAY BE A PRECURSOR OF BLEPHAROSPASM: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this five-year longitudinal study was to investigate whether patients with increased blinking develop orbicularis oculi muscle spasms.

METHODS: Eleven patients who initially manifested increased blinking alone were clinically and neurophysiologically re-evaluated five years later.

RESULTS: By the five-year follow-up assessment, nine of the 11 patients had developed orbicularis oculi muscle spasms. The blink reflex recovery cycle became abnormal whereas somatosensory temporal discrimination, already abnormal at the first evaluation, did not significantly change.

CONCLUSIONS: Our longitudinal study demonstrates that increased blinking may precede blepharospasm and that an abnormal blink reflex recovery cycle reflects the development of orbicularis oculi muscle spasms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)733-736
Number of pages4
JournalMovement Disorders Clinical Practice
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 31 2017

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Blepharospasm
Blinking
Longitudinal Studies
Spasm
Abnormal Reflexes

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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INCREASED BLINKING MAY BE A PRECURSOR OF BLEPHAROSPASM : A LONGITUDINAL STUDY. / Conte, Antonella; Ferrazzano, Gina; Defazio, Giovanni; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Hallett, Mark; Berardelli, Alfredo.

In: Movement Disorders Clinical Practice, Vol. 4, No. 5, 31.10.2017, p. 733-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Defazio, Giovanni

AU - Fabbrini, Giovanni

AU - Hallett, Mark

AU - Berardelli, Alfredo

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this five-year longitudinal study was to investigate whether patients with increased blinking develop orbicularis oculi muscle spasms.METHODS: Eleven patients who initially manifested increased blinking alone were clinically and neurophysiologically re-evaluated five years later.RESULTS: By the five-year follow-up assessment, nine of the 11 patients had developed orbicularis oculi muscle spasms. The blink reflex recovery cycle became abnormal whereas somatosensory temporal discrimination, already abnormal at the first evaluation, did not significantly change.CONCLUSIONS: Our longitudinal study demonstrates that increased blinking may precede blepharospasm and that an abnormal blink reflex recovery cycle reflects the development of orbicularis oculi muscle spasms.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this five-year longitudinal study was to investigate whether patients with increased blinking develop orbicularis oculi muscle spasms.METHODS: Eleven patients who initially manifested increased blinking alone were clinically and neurophysiologically re-evaluated five years later.RESULTS: By the five-year follow-up assessment, nine of the 11 patients had developed orbicularis oculi muscle spasms. The blink reflex recovery cycle became abnormal whereas somatosensory temporal discrimination, already abnormal at the first evaluation, did not significantly change.CONCLUSIONS: Our longitudinal study demonstrates that increased blinking may precede blepharospasm and that an abnormal blink reflex recovery cycle reflects the development of orbicularis oculi muscle spasms.

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