Increased level of serum HLA class I antigens in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Correlation with disease activity

A. Bresciani, G. Pirozzi, M. Spera, M. L. Lombardi, L. Ambrosone, S. Migliaresi, S. Ferrone, C. Manzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The level of soluble β2-μ-associaied HLA Class I heavy chains (sHLA-I) and of soluble β2-μ-free HLA Class I heavy chains (sHLA-FHC) was found to be significantly higher in sera from 58 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in those from 82 age and sex-matched controls. The level of serum sHLA-I in patients with SLE was significantly correlated to disease activity. Western blotting analysis showed that the 44-kDa isoform represents the major component in the antigens immuno-precipitated by anti-β2-μ mAb NAMB-I and by anti-β2-μ-free HLA Class I heavy chain mAb HC-10 from sera of patients with SLE. These results suggest that the increased serum levels of sHLA-I and of sHLA-FHC in patients with SLE reflect their increased shedding from cell membrane. In view of the ability of sHLA-I and of sHLA-FHC to induce apoptosis of activated T cells, it is suggested that their increased serum levels in patients with SLE is triggered by dysregulation of the immune system leading to T-cell activation. The increased serum levels of sHLA-I and of sHLA-FHC may be used by the immune system to control the pool of activated T cells by inducing apoptosis. If this possibility is proven to be correct, modulation of the serum level of sHLA-I and of sHLA-FHC may be utilized to develop strategies to treat SLE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-50
Number of pages7
JournalTissue Antigens
Volume52
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Double determinant immunoassay
  • Serum β-μ-free HLA-I heavy chain
  • Serum HLA-I
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Western blot

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology

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