Increased reaction time predicts visual learning deficits in Parkinson's disease

Lucio Marinelli, Bernardo Perfetti, Clara Moisello, Alessandro Di Rocco, David Eidelberg, Giovanni Abbruzzese, Maria Felice Ghilardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether the process involved in movement preparation of patients in the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) shares attentional resources with visual learning, we tested 23 patients with PD and 13 healthy controls with two different tasks. The first was a motor task where subjects were required to move as soon as possible to randomly presented targets by minimizing reaction time. The second was a visual learning task where targets were presented in a preset order and subjects were asked to learn the sequence order by attending to the display without moving. Patients with PD showed higher reaction and movement times, while visual learning was reduced compared with controls. For patients with PD, reaction times, but not movement times, displayed an inverse significant correlation with the scores of visual learning. We conclude that visual declarative learning and movement preparation might share similar attentional and working memory resources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1498-1501
Number of pages4
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 30 2010

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Reaction Time
Parkinson Disease
Learning
Short-Term Memory

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Executive function
  • Motor control
  • Parkinson's disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Marinelli, L., Perfetti, B., Moisello, C., Di Rocco, A., Eidelberg, D., Abbruzzese, G., & Ghilardi, M. F. (2010). Increased reaction time predicts visual learning deficits in Parkinson's disease. Movement Disorders, 25(10), 1498-1501. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.23156

Increased reaction time predicts visual learning deficits in Parkinson's disease. / Marinelli, Lucio; Perfetti, Bernardo; Moisello, Clara; Di Rocco, Alessandro; Eidelberg, David; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Ghilardi, Maria Felice.

In: Movement Disorders, Vol. 25, No. 10, 30.07.2010, p. 1498-1501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marinelli, L, Perfetti, B, Moisello, C, Di Rocco, A, Eidelberg, D, Abbruzzese, G & Ghilardi, MF 2010, 'Increased reaction time predicts visual learning deficits in Parkinson's disease', Movement Disorders, vol. 25, no. 10, pp. 1498-1501. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.23156
Marinelli L, Perfetti B, Moisello C, Di Rocco A, Eidelberg D, Abbruzzese G et al. Increased reaction time predicts visual learning deficits in Parkinson's disease. Movement Disorders. 2010 Jul 30;25(10):1498-1501. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.23156
Marinelli, Lucio ; Perfetti, Bernardo ; Moisello, Clara ; Di Rocco, Alessandro ; Eidelberg, David ; Abbruzzese, Giovanni ; Ghilardi, Maria Felice. / Increased reaction time predicts visual learning deficits in Parkinson's disease. In: Movement Disorders. 2010 ; Vol. 25, No. 10. pp. 1498-1501.
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