Increasing adiposity is associated with higher adipokine levels and lower bone mineral density in obese older adults

Lina Aguirre, Nicola Napoli, Debra Waters, Clifford Qualls, Dennis T. Villareal, Reina Armamento-Villareal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Although obesity is associated with high bone mass, recent reports suggest an increase in the incidence of fractures in obese patients. Copyright

Objectives: The objectives of the study were to evaluate the influence of increasing body fat on bone mineral density (BMD) and to determine the influence of the different adipokines on BMD in frail obese elderly patients.

Design and Setting: This is a cross-sectional study of baseline characteristics of elderly obese patients participating in a lifestyle therapy with diet with or without exercise and conducted in a university setting.

Patients: One hundred seventy-three, elderly (≥65 y old), obese (body mass index of ≥30 kg/m2) who were mostly frail participated in the study.

Outcome Measures: BMD, percentage of total body fat, percentage of fat-free mass, percentage of lean mass, body mass index, adiponectin, leptin, IL-6, bone turnover markers (osteocalcin and C-telopeptide), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, free estradiol, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured.

Results: Higher tertiles of percentagebodyfatandlower lean masswereassociated with a lowerBMD. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were highest in the highest fat tertile (third, 5.5±5.4 vs first, 1.5±1.3 mg/L, P

Conclusions: Increasing adiposity together with decreasing lean mass is associated with lower BMD, higher adipokine levels, and worsening frailty in elderly obese adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3290-3297
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume99
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2014

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Adipokines
Adiposity
Bone Density
Minerals
Bone
Fats
C-Reactive Protein
Adipose Tissue
Body Mass Index
Diet Therapy
Frail Elderly
Bone Remodeling
Adiponectin
Osteocalcin
Leptin
Life Style
Estradiol
Interleukin-6
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Increasing adiposity is associated with higher adipokine levels and lower bone mineral density in obese older adults. / Aguirre, Lina; Napoli, Nicola; Waters, Debra; Qualls, Clifford; Villareal, Dennis T.; Armamento-Villareal, Reina.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 99, No. 9, 01.09.2014, p. 3290-3297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aguirre, Lina ; Napoli, Nicola ; Waters, Debra ; Qualls, Clifford ; Villareal, Dennis T. ; Armamento-Villareal, Reina. / Increasing adiposity is associated with higher adipokine levels and lower bone mineral density in obese older adults. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2014 ; Vol. 99, No. 9. pp. 3290-3297.
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