Indications for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: The EBMT transplant consensus

P. Dreger, P. Corradini, E. Kimby, M. Michallet, D. Milligan, J. Schetelig, W. Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, D. Niederwieser, M. Hallek, E. Montserrat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this project was to identify situations where allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) might be considered as a preferred treatment option for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Based on a MEDLINE search and additional sources, a consented proposal was drafted, refined and approved upon final discussion by an international expert panel. Key elements of the consensus are (1) allo-SCT is a procedure with evidence-based efficacy in poor-risk CLL; (2) although definition of 'poor-risk CLL' requires further investigation, allo-SCT is a reasonable treatment option for younger patients with (i) non-response or early relapse (within 12 months) after purine analogues, (ii) relapse within 24 months after having achieved a response with purine-analogue-based combination therapy or autologous transplantation, and (iii) patients with p53 abnormalities requiring treatment; and (3) optimum transplant strategies may vary according to distinct clinical situations and should be defined in prospective trials. This is the first attempt to define standard indications for allo-SCT in CLL. Nevertheless, whenever possible, allo-SCT should be performed within disease-specific prospective clinical protocols in order to continuously refine transplant indications according to new developments in risk assessment and treatment of CLL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-17
Number of pages6
JournalLeukemia
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Cancer Research

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