Indocyanine green (ICG) temporary clipping test to assess collateral circulation before venous sacrifice

Paolo Ferroli, Peter Nakaji, Francesco Acerbi, Erminia Albanese, Giovanni Broggi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background As a general principle, sacrifice of cerebral veins at surgery is avoided. However, at times sacrifice of a vein may be desirable to increase surgical exposure. At present, no method exists to predict whether such sacrifice will be accommodated by the presence of collateral venous drainage. We show a simple technique to examine cerebral venous blood flow using indocyanine green videoangiography. Methods In two patients, parasagittal meningiomas were found to be associated with paramedian veins that impeded complete removal of the tumors. The suitability of veins removal was assessed by applying a temporary aneurysm clip and performing an indocyanine green videoangiogram. Results In one patient, stasis was observed in the vein. In the second patient, a collateral flow allowed the venous blood to drain. The former test was considered a counterindication for venous sacrifice, whereas the latter supported its feasibility. The vein was preserved in the former case and coagulated in the latter. In both cases, the patients did well. Conclusions Although our limited study cannot prove that venous congestion or infarction can be avoided with this technique, it does provide direct evidence of the presence or absence of collaterals that can help guide intraoperative surgical decision-making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-125
Number of pages4
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Collateral Circulation
Indocyanine Green
Veins
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Cerebral Veins
Hyperemia
Meningioma
Surgical Instruments
Infarction
Aneurysm
Drainage
Decision Making
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Brain tumor
  • Cerebral veins
  • Cerebrovascular neurosurgery
  • Indocyanine green angiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Indocyanine green (ICG) temporary clipping test to assess collateral circulation before venous sacrifice. / Ferroli, Paolo; Nakaji, Peter; Acerbi, Francesco; Albanese, Erminia; Broggi, Giovanni.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 75, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 122-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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