Induction of HIV-blocking anti-CCR5 IgA in peyers's patches without histopathological alterations

Claudia Pastori, Lorenzo Diomede, Assunta Venuti, Gregory Fisher, Jonathan Jarvik, Morgane Bomsel, Francesca Sanvito, Lucia Lopalco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The chemokine receptor CCR5 is essential for HIV infection and is thus a potential target for vaccine development. However, because CCR5 is a host protein, generation of anti-CCR5 antibodies requires the breaking of immune tolerance and thus carries the risk of autoimmune responses. In this study, performed in mice, we compared 3 different immunogens representing surface domains of murine CCR5, 4 different adjuvants, and 13 different immunization protocols, with the goal of eliciting HIV-blocking activity without inducing autoimmune dysfunction. In all cases the CCR5 sequences were presented as fusions to the Flock House virus (FHV) capsid precursor protein. We found that systemic immunization and mucosal boosting elicited CCR5-specific antibodies and achieved consistent priming in Peyer's patches, where most cells showed a phenotype corresponding to activated B cells and secreted high levels of IgA, representing up to one-third of the total HIV-blocking activity. Histopathological analysis revealed mild to moderate chronic inflammation in some tissues but failed in reporting signs of autoimmune dysfunction associated with immunizations. Antisera against immunogens representing the N terminus and extracellular loops 1 and 2 (Nter1 and ECL1 and ECL2) of CCR5 were generated. All showed specific anti-HIV activity, which was stronger in the anti-ECL1 and-ECL2 sera than in the anti-Nter sera. ECL1 and ECL2 antisera induced nearly complete long-lasting CCR5 downregulation of the receptor, and especially, their IgG-depleted fractions prevented HIV infection in neutralization and transcytosis assays. In conclusion, the ECL1 and ECL2 domains could offer a promising path to achieve significant anti-HIV activity in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3623-3635
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume88
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Peyer's Patches
Peyer's patches
antiserum
immunization
HIV infections
HIV
Immunization
Flock house virus
physiological transport
antigens
HIV Infections
Immune Sera
autoimmunity
antibodies
capsid
immunosuppression
mice
vaccine development
CCR5 Receptors
blood serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Induction of HIV-blocking anti-CCR5 IgA in peyers's patches without histopathological alterations. / Pastori, Claudia; Diomede, Lorenzo; Venuti, Assunta; Fisher, Gregory; Jarvik, Jonathan; Bomsel, Morgane; Sanvito, Francesca; Lopalco, Lucia.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 88, No. 7, 2014, p. 3623-3635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pastori, Claudia ; Diomede, Lorenzo ; Venuti, Assunta ; Fisher, Gregory ; Jarvik, Jonathan ; Bomsel, Morgane ; Sanvito, Francesca ; Lopalco, Lucia. / Induction of HIV-blocking anti-CCR5 IgA in peyers's patches without histopathological alterations. In: Journal of Virology. 2014 ; Vol. 88, No. 7. pp. 3623-3635.
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