Infections and autoimmunity: Role of human cytomegalovirus in autoimmune endothelial cell damage

M. Dolcino, A. Puccetti, A. Barbieri, C. Bason, E. Tinazzi, A. Ottria, G. Patuzzo, N. Martinelli, C. Lunardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Molecular mimicry between infectious agents and normal human host cell proteins represents one of the possible mechanisms responsible for autoimmunity. Among infectious agents, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an ideal candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders because of its lifelong persistence through periods of reactivation and latency and because of the extensive manipulation of innate and adaptive immunity. HCMV has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular damage in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and atherosclerosis. Based on our data, which demonstrate a cause-and-effect relationship between HCMV and endothelial cell aggression in SSc and atherosclerosis, we propose that immune responses to particular HCMV proteins may result in autoaggression through a mechanism of molecular mimicry of normally expressed endothelial cell surface molecules.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-432
Number of pages14
JournalLupus
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 25 2015

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Keywords

  • atherosclerosis
  • autoimmune response
  • endothelial cells
  • HCMV
  • systemic sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dolcino, M., Puccetti, A., Barbieri, A., Bason, C., Tinazzi, E., Ottria, A., Patuzzo, G., Martinelli, N., & Lunardi, C. (2015). Infections and autoimmunity: Role of human cytomegalovirus in autoimmune endothelial cell damage. Lupus, 24, 419-432. https://doi.org/10.1177/0961203314558677