Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy

Silvia Suardi, Chiara Vimercati, Cristina Casalone, Daniela Gelmetti, Cristiano Corona, Barbara Iulini, Maria Mazza, Guerino Lombardi, Fabio Moda, Margherita Ruggerone, Ilaria Campagnani, Elena Piccoli, Marcella Catania, Martin H. Groschup, Anne Balkema-Buschmann, Maria Caramelli, Salvatore Monaco, Gianluigi Zanusso, Fabrizio Tagliavini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The amyloidotic form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) termed BASE is caused by a prion strain whose biological properties differ from those of typical BSE, resulting in a clinically and pathologically distinct phenotype. Whether peripheral tissues of BASE-affected cattle contain infectivity is unknown. This is a critical issue since the BASE prion is readily transmissible to a variety of hosts including primates, suggesting that humans may be susceptible. We carried out bioassays in transgenic mice overexpressing bovine PrP (Tgbov XV) and found infectivity in a variety of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE. Noteworthy, all BASE muscles used for inoculation transmitted disease, although the attack rate differed between experimental and natural cases (~70% versus ~10%, respectively). This difference was likely related to different prion titers, possibly due to different stages of disease in the two conditions, i.e. terminal stage in experimental BASE and pre-symptomatic stage in natural BASE. The neuropathological phenotype and PrP res type were consistent in all affected mice and matched those of Tgbov XV mice infected with brain homogenate from natural BASE. The immunohistochemical analysis of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE showed the presence of abnormal prion protein deposits within muscle fibers. Conversely, Tgbov XV mice challenged with lymphoid tissue and kidney from natural and experimental BASE did not develop disease. The novel information on the neuromuscular tropism of the BASE strain, efficiently overcoming species barriers, underlines the relevance of maintaining an active surveillance.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere31449
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 21 2012

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Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
bovine spongiform encephalopathy
prions
Muscle
skeletal muscle
Prions
Skeletal Muscle
pathogenicity
cattle
mice
PrPSc Proteins
Tissue
Phenotype
phenotype
Muscles
tropisms
Tropism
Bioassay
Lymphoid Tissue
muscle fibers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Suardi, S., Vimercati, C., Casalone, C., Gelmetti, D., Corona, C., Iulini, B., ... Tagliavini, F. (2012). Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy. PLoS One, 7(2), [e31449]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0031449

Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy. / Suardi, Silvia; Vimercati, Chiara; Casalone, Cristina; Gelmetti, Daniela; Corona, Cristiano; Iulini, Barbara; Mazza, Maria; Lombardi, Guerino; Moda, Fabio; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Piccoli, Elena; Catania, Marcella; Groschup, Martin H.; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Caramelli, Maria; Monaco, Salvatore; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 2, e31449, 21.02.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suardi, S, Vimercati, C, Casalone, C, Gelmetti, D, Corona, C, Iulini, B, Mazza, M, Lombardi, G, Moda, F, Ruggerone, M, Campagnani, I, Piccoli, E, Catania, M, Groschup, MH, Balkema-Buschmann, A, Caramelli, M, Monaco, S, Zanusso, G & Tagliavini, F 2012, 'Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 2, e31449. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0031449
Suardi S, Vimercati C, Casalone C, Gelmetti D, Corona C, Iulini B et al. Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy. PLoS One. 2012 Feb 21;7(2). e31449. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0031449
Suardi, Silvia ; Vimercati, Chiara ; Casalone, Cristina ; Gelmetti, Daniela ; Corona, Cristiano ; Iulini, Barbara ; Mazza, Maria ; Lombardi, Guerino ; Moda, Fabio ; Ruggerone, Margherita ; Campagnani, Ilaria ; Piccoli, Elena ; Catania, Marcella ; Groschup, Martin H. ; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne ; Caramelli, Maria ; Monaco, Salvatore ; Zanusso, Gianluigi ; Tagliavini, Fabrizio. / Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 2.
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