Influence of controlled encoding and retrieval facilitation on memory performance in patients with different profiles of mild cognitive impairment

Roberta Perri, Marco Monaco, Lucia Fadda, Laura Serra, Camillo Marra, Carlo Caltagirone, Amalia C. Bruni, Sabrina Curcio, M. Bozzali, Giovanni A. Carlesimo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Memory tests able to differentiate encoding and retrieval processes from the memoranda storing ones should be used to differentiate patients in a very early phase of AD. In fact, individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be characterized by two different memory profiles: a pure amnestic one (with poor learning and retrieval and poor improvement when encoding is assisted and retrieval is facilitated) and a dysexecutive one (with inefficient encoding and/or poor retrieval strategies and improvement with assisted encoding and retrieval). The amnestic profile characterizes subjects affected by medio-temporal atrophy typical of AD. In this study, a Grober–Buschke memory procedure was used to evaluate normal controls and MCI patients with different cognitive profiles: pure amnestic (aMCIsd), amnestic plus other cognitive impairments (aMCImd) and non-amnestic (naMCI). An index of sensitivity of cueing (ISC) measured the advantage passing from free to cued recall. Results showed that both strategic and consolidation abilities were impaired in the aMCIsd and aMCImd groups and were preserved in the naMCI group. aMCImd, however, compensated the memory deficit with assisted encoding and retrieval, but aMCIsd performed very poorly. When MCI subjects were defined according to the ISC value, subjects with poor ISC were primarily in the aMCIsd group and, to a lesser extent, in the aMCImd group and the naMCI group. Finally, patients with a poor ISC showed cerebral atrophy documented in the precocious phase of AD and the retrosplenial cerebral areas seemed to be the most useful areas for identifying patients in the early phase of AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)938-948
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurology
Volume262
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Atrophy
Aptitude
Memory Disorders
Learning
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Free and cued selective reminding test
  • Memory
  • Mild cognitive impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Influence of controlled encoding and retrieval facilitation on memory performance in patients with different profiles of mild cognitive impairment. / Perri, Roberta; Monaco, Marco; Fadda, Lucia; Serra, Laura; Marra, Camillo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bruni, Amalia C.; Curcio, Sabrina; Bozzali, M.; Carlesimo, Giovanni A.

In: Journal of Neurology, Vol. 262, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 938-948.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{42c097c9549c45c7befb72365d2de900,
title = "Influence of controlled encoding and retrieval facilitation on memory performance in patients with different profiles of mild cognitive impairment",
abstract = "Memory tests able to differentiate encoding and retrieval processes from the memoranda storing ones should be used to differentiate patients in a very early phase of AD. In fact, individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be characterized by two different memory profiles: a pure amnestic one (with poor learning and retrieval and poor improvement when encoding is assisted and retrieval is facilitated) and a dysexecutive one (with inefficient encoding and/or poor retrieval strategies and improvement with assisted encoding and retrieval). The amnestic profile characterizes subjects affected by medio-temporal atrophy typical of AD. In this study, a Grober–Buschke memory procedure was used to evaluate normal controls and MCI patients with different cognitive profiles: pure amnestic (aMCIsd), amnestic plus other cognitive impairments (aMCImd) and non-amnestic (naMCI). An index of sensitivity of cueing (ISC) measured the advantage passing from free to cued recall. Results showed that both strategic and consolidation abilities were impaired in the aMCIsd and aMCImd groups and were preserved in the naMCI group. aMCImd, however, compensated the memory deficit with assisted encoding and retrieval, but aMCIsd performed very poorly. When MCI subjects were defined according to the ISC value, subjects with poor ISC were primarily in the aMCIsd group and, to a lesser extent, in the aMCImd group and the naMCI group. Finally, patients with a poor ISC showed cerebral atrophy documented in the precocious phase of AD and the retrosplenial cerebral areas seemed to be the most useful areas for identifying patients in the early phase of AD.",
keywords = "Alzheimer’s disease, Free and cued selective reminding test, Memory, Mild cognitive impairment",
author = "Roberta Perri and Marco Monaco and Lucia Fadda and Laura Serra and Camillo Marra and Carlo Caltagirone and Bruni, {Amalia C.} and Sabrina Curcio and M. Bozzali and Carlesimo, {Giovanni A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00415-015-7662-2",
language = "English",
volume = "262",
pages = "938--948",
journal = "Journal of Neurology",
issn = "0340-5354",
publisher = "Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag GmbH and Co. KG",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of controlled encoding and retrieval facilitation on memory performance in patients with different profiles of mild cognitive impairment

AU - Perri, Roberta

AU - Monaco, Marco

AU - Fadda, Lucia

AU - Serra, Laura

AU - Marra, Camillo

AU - Caltagirone, Carlo

AU - Bruni, Amalia C.

AU - Curcio, Sabrina

AU - Bozzali, M.

AU - Carlesimo, Giovanni A.

PY - 2015/4/1

Y1 - 2015/4/1

N2 - Memory tests able to differentiate encoding and retrieval processes from the memoranda storing ones should be used to differentiate patients in a very early phase of AD. In fact, individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be characterized by two different memory profiles: a pure amnestic one (with poor learning and retrieval and poor improvement when encoding is assisted and retrieval is facilitated) and a dysexecutive one (with inefficient encoding and/or poor retrieval strategies and improvement with assisted encoding and retrieval). The amnestic profile characterizes subjects affected by medio-temporal atrophy typical of AD. In this study, a Grober–Buschke memory procedure was used to evaluate normal controls and MCI patients with different cognitive profiles: pure amnestic (aMCIsd), amnestic plus other cognitive impairments (aMCImd) and non-amnestic (naMCI). An index of sensitivity of cueing (ISC) measured the advantage passing from free to cued recall. Results showed that both strategic and consolidation abilities were impaired in the aMCIsd and aMCImd groups and were preserved in the naMCI group. aMCImd, however, compensated the memory deficit with assisted encoding and retrieval, but aMCIsd performed very poorly. When MCI subjects were defined according to the ISC value, subjects with poor ISC were primarily in the aMCIsd group and, to a lesser extent, in the aMCImd group and the naMCI group. Finally, patients with a poor ISC showed cerebral atrophy documented in the precocious phase of AD and the retrosplenial cerebral areas seemed to be the most useful areas for identifying patients in the early phase of AD.

AB - Memory tests able to differentiate encoding and retrieval processes from the memoranda storing ones should be used to differentiate patients in a very early phase of AD. In fact, individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be characterized by two different memory profiles: a pure amnestic one (with poor learning and retrieval and poor improvement when encoding is assisted and retrieval is facilitated) and a dysexecutive one (with inefficient encoding and/or poor retrieval strategies and improvement with assisted encoding and retrieval). The amnestic profile characterizes subjects affected by medio-temporal atrophy typical of AD. In this study, a Grober–Buschke memory procedure was used to evaluate normal controls and MCI patients with different cognitive profiles: pure amnestic (aMCIsd), amnestic plus other cognitive impairments (aMCImd) and non-amnestic (naMCI). An index of sensitivity of cueing (ISC) measured the advantage passing from free to cued recall. Results showed that both strategic and consolidation abilities were impaired in the aMCIsd and aMCImd groups and were preserved in the naMCI group. aMCImd, however, compensated the memory deficit with assisted encoding and retrieval, but aMCIsd performed very poorly. When MCI subjects were defined according to the ISC value, subjects with poor ISC were primarily in the aMCIsd group and, to a lesser extent, in the aMCImd group and the naMCI group. Finally, patients with a poor ISC showed cerebral atrophy documented in the precocious phase of AD and the retrosplenial cerebral areas seemed to be the most useful areas for identifying patients in the early phase of AD.

KW - Alzheimer’s disease

KW - Free and cued selective reminding test

KW - Memory

KW - Mild cognitive impairment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84939955236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84939955236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00415-015-7662-2

DO - 10.1007/s00415-015-7662-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 25670528

AN - SCOPUS:84939955236

VL - 262

SP - 938

EP - 948

JO - Journal of Neurology

JF - Journal of Neurology

SN - 0340-5354

IS - 4

ER -