Influence of different anaesthetics on extracellular aminoacids in rat brain

A. Rozza, E. Masoero, L. Favalli, E. Lanza, S. Govoni, V. Rizzo, L. Montalbetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We used different anaesthetic procedures to study the possible effects of anaesthesia on extracellular aminoacid concentration in rat brain. Glutamate, aspartate and glycine concentrations were determined by HPLC in samples collected from the right fronto-parietal region of the rat brain cortex by transcerebral microdialysis before and up to 2 h following anaesthesia induction. Anaesthesia induced by ketamine, alone or in association with xylazine, caused a significant decrease in the levels of glutamate, aspartate and glycine, compared to before anaesthesia values (range: 27-72% according to the time of sampling and to the anaesthetic used). Inhalation anaesthesia with halothane (3%) in N2O/O2 mixture produced no significant effects on aminoacid levels. Equitensine (pentobarbital in association with chloral hydrate and ethanol) and pentobarbital also had no significant effect on glutamate, aspartate and glycine levels during anaesthesia. This demonstrates that some anaesthetics alter excitatory aminoacid release and suggests that Equitensine may represent an easy and reliable method to induce a long lasting anaesthesia associated without changes in excitatory aminoacid extracellular concentration. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-169
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume101
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 15 2000

Fingerprint

Anesthetics
Anesthesia
Brain
Aspartic Acid
Glycine
Glutamic Acid
Pentobarbital
Inhalation Anesthesia
Chloral Hydrate
Xylazine
Parietal Lobe
Microdialysis
Ketamine
Halothane
Ethanol
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

Keywords

  • Anaesthetics
  • Excitatory aminoacids
  • Glycine
  • Microdialysis
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Influence of different anaesthetics on extracellular aminoacids in rat brain. / Rozza, A.; Masoero, E.; Favalli, L.; Lanza, E.; Govoni, S.; Rizzo, V.; Montalbetti, L.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 101, No. 2, 15.09.2000, p. 165-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rozza, A, Masoero, E, Favalli, L, Lanza, E, Govoni, S, Rizzo, V & Montalbetti, L 2000, 'Influence of different anaesthetics on extracellular aminoacids in rat brain', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, vol. 101, no. 2, pp. 165-169. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0165-0270(00)00266-1
Rozza, A. ; Masoero, E. ; Favalli, L. ; Lanza, E. ; Govoni, S. ; Rizzo, V. ; Montalbetti, L. / Influence of different anaesthetics on extracellular aminoacids in rat brain. In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods. 2000 ; Vol. 101, No. 2. pp. 165-169.
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