Influence of intensive multifunctional neurorehabilitation on neuronal oxidative damage in patients with Huntington’s disease

Irene Ciancarelli, Daniela De Amicis, Caterina Di Massimo, Giorgio Sandrini, Caterina Pistarini, Antonio Carolei, Maria Giuliana Tozzi Ciancarelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The influence of intensive multifunctional neurorehabilitation on serum levels of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as markers of oxidative damage, was evaluated in symptomatic patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). Improved clinical outcome measures were observed after neuroreha-bilitation. Baseline levels of Cu/Zn-SOD, NSE and 8-OHdG were higher than those observed in controls. Cu/Zn-SOD and NSE values decreased after neuroreha-bilitation, but were still higher than those measured in controls. Cu/Zn-SOD and NSE correlated positively before (r=0.659; p=0.003) and after rehabilitation (r=0.553, p=0.017). 8-OHdG values decreased after neurorehabili-tation without reaching significance when compared with baseline values (p=0.145). No correlation was observed between the measured oxidative markers and the assessed clinical outcome measures, either before or after neurorehabilitation. The findings reported in the present paper provide evidence of the effectiveness of neurorehabilitation in reducing oxidative damage in HD patients and underline the limit of serum oxidative markers for the evaluation of clinical features of HD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-52
Number of pages6
JournalFunctional Neurology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 30 2015

Keywords

  • 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine
  • Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Neuron-specific enolase
  • Neurorehabilitation
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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