Influence of personality on the relationship between gray matter volume and neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis

Ralph H B Benedict, Carolyn E. Schwartz, Paul Duberstein, Brian Healy, Marietta Hoogs, Niels Bergsland, Michael G. Dwyer, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Robert Zivadinov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Research has revealed an association between personality traits and health outcomes, and in multiple sclerosis (MS), there are preliminary data showing a correlation between personality traits and brain volume. We examined the general hypothesis that personality influences the relationship between gray matter volume (GMV) and cognitive/neuropsychiatric MS features. METHODS: Participants were 98 patients with MS who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and were tested with the Symbol Digit Modalities Test and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, the latter providing measures of depression and euphoria that can be characteristic of MS, that is, cheerful indifference and disinhibition. Personality traits were assessed with the NEO Five Factor Inventory. We examined the correlation between personality traits and both GMV and symptoms, and then modeled mediation and moderation influences on the relationships between GMV and cognitive/neuropsychiatric features. RESULTS: Linear regression modeling revealed that GMV (r = 0.54, p <.001) and NEO Five Factor Inventory low conscientiousness (r = 0.36, p = .001) were associated with cognitive function, but no mediator or moderator effects were observed. However, conscientiousness mediated the relationship between GMV and symptoms of euphoria (p = .002). The moderator analysis revealed a significant influence of high neuroticism on the GMV-euphoria relationship (p = .029). CONCLUSIONS: Low conscientiousness and high neuroticism are associated with neuropsychiatric complications in MS, and each influences the relationship between GMV and euphoria. The findings suggest that patients with low conscientiousness are at higher risk for MS-associated cognitive dysfunction and neuropsychiatric symptoms, a conclusion that has implications for the emerging role of personality in clinical neuroscience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-261
Number of pages9
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

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Multiple Sclerosis
Personality
Equipment and Supplies
Neurosciences
Gray Matter
Grey Matter
Cognition
Linear Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Depression
Conscientiousness
Personality Traits
Health
Brain
Research

Keywords

  • cognition
  • gray matter volume
  • multiple sclerosis
  • neuropsychiatric symptoms
  • personality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Influence of personality on the relationship between gray matter volume and neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis. / Benedict, Ralph H B; Schwartz, Carolyn E.; Duberstein, Paul; Healy, Brian; Hoogs, Marietta; Bergsland, Niels; Dwyer, Michael G.; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Zivadinov, Robert.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 75, No. 3, 04.2013, p. 253-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Benedict, RHB, Schwartz, CE, Duberstein, P, Healy, B, Hoogs, M, Bergsland, N, Dwyer, MG, Weinstock-Guttman, B & Zivadinov, R 2013, 'Influence of personality on the relationship between gray matter volume and neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis', Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 75, no. 3, pp. 253-261. https://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e31828837cc
Benedict, Ralph H B ; Schwartz, Carolyn E. ; Duberstein, Paul ; Healy, Brian ; Hoogs, Marietta ; Bergsland, Niels ; Dwyer, Michael G. ; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca ; Zivadinov, Robert. / Influence of personality on the relationship between gray matter volume and neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis. In: Psychosomatic Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 75, No. 3. pp. 253-261.
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AB - OBJECTIVE: Research has revealed an association between personality traits and health outcomes, and in multiple sclerosis (MS), there are preliminary data showing a correlation between personality traits and brain volume. We examined the general hypothesis that personality influences the relationship between gray matter volume (GMV) and cognitive/neuropsychiatric MS features. METHODS: Participants were 98 patients with MS who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and were tested with the Symbol Digit Modalities Test and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, the latter providing measures of depression and euphoria that can be characteristic of MS, that is, cheerful indifference and disinhibition. Personality traits were assessed with the NEO Five Factor Inventory. We examined the correlation between personality traits and both GMV and symptoms, and then modeled mediation and moderation influences on the relationships between GMV and cognitive/neuropsychiatric features. RESULTS: Linear regression modeling revealed that GMV (r = 0.54, p <.001) and NEO Five Factor Inventory low conscientiousness (r = 0.36, p = .001) were associated with cognitive function, but no mediator or moderator effects were observed. However, conscientiousness mediated the relationship between GMV and symptoms of euphoria (p = .002). The moderator analysis revealed a significant influence of high neuroticism on the GMV-euphoria relationship (p = .029). CONCLUSIONS: Low conscientiousness and high neuroticism are associated with neuropsychiatric complications in MS, and each influences the relationship between GMV and euphoria. The findings suggest that patients with low conscientiousness are at higher risk for MS-associated cognitive dysfunction and neuropsychiatric symptoms, a conclusion that has implications for the emerging role of personality in clinical neuroscience.

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