Influence of residual ischaemia on heart rate variability after myocardial infarction

D. Cerati, F. Nador, R. Maestri, M. Mantica, A. Binda, S. Perlini, E. Vanoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite the growing evidence for the positive predictive value of depressed baroreflex sensitivity and/or reduced heart rate variability after myocardial infarction, the mechanisms involved in these autonomic alterations are not fully understood. Specifically, the possible influence of residual ischaemia has not been assessed. To address this problem we studied the spectral analysis of heart rate variability in 21 patients with a first myocardial infarction in whom the only clinical correlate was the presence of residual ischaemia, as documented by the positive response to both an exercise stress test and an echocardiographic stress test. Data from these patients were compared with those obtained in a group of post-myocardial infarction patients similar for several risk factors, age, site of myocardial infarction, but without residual ischaemia. Patients positive for residual ischaemia had lower power in the whole spectrum (1146 ± 158 vs 1631 ± 159 ms2, P = 0.032) as well as in the low and high frequency bands of heart rate variability. A nocturnal increase in high frequency was observed in those without residual ischaemia (from 167 ± 35 to 242 ± 51 ms2, +45%, P = 0.034), but not in those with residual ischaemia (from 111 ± 19 to 141 ± 29 ms2, +27%, ns).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-83
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Heart Journal
Volume18
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Ischemia
Heart Rate
Myocardial Infarction
Exercise Test
Baroreflex

Keywords

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Myocardial ischaemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Influence of residual ischaemia on heart rate variability after myocardial infarction. / Cerati, D.; Nador, F.; Maestri, R.; Mantica, M.; Binda, A.; Perlini, S.; Vanoli, E.

In: European Heart Journal, Vol. 18, No. 1, 1997, p. 78-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Perlini, S.

AU - Vanoli, E.

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