Inhibition of CREB activity in the dorsal portion of the striatum potentiates behavioral responses to drugs of abuse

Stefania Fasano, Christopher Pittenger, Riccardo Brambilla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The striatum participates in multiple forms of behavioral adaptation, including habit formation, other forms of procedural memory, and short- and long-term responses to drugs of abuse. The cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) family of transcription factors has been implicated in various forms of behavioral plasticity, but its role in the dorsal portion of the striatum-has been little explored. We previously showed that in transgenic mice in which CREB function is inhibited in the dorsal striatum, bidirectional synaptic plasticity and certain forms of long-term procedural memory are impaired. Here we show, in startling contrast, that inhibition of striatal CREB facilitates cocaine- and morphine-place conditioning and enhances locomotor sensitization to cocaine. These findings propose CREB as a positive regulator of dorsal striatumdependent procedural learning but a negative regulator of drug-related learning.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFrontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein
Street Drugs
Cocaine
Learning
Corpus Striatum
Neuronal Plasticity
Long-Term Memory
Short-Term Memory
Morphine
Transgenic Mice
Habits
Transcription Factors
Inhibition (Psychology)
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Cocaine
  • Conditioned place preference
  • CREB
  • Dorsal striatum
  • Locomotor sensitization
  • Morphine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Inhibition of CREB activity in the dorsal portion of the striatum potentiates behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. / Fasano, Stefania; Pittenger, Christopher; Brambilla, Riccardo.

In: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, Vol. 3, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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