Inhibitory receptor signals suppress ligation-induced recruitment of NKG2D to GM1-rich membrane domains at the human NK cell immune synapse

Johanna Endt, Fiona E. McCann, Catarina R. Almeida, Doris Urlaub, Rufina Leung, Daniela Pende, Daniel M. Davis, Carsten Watzl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on all human NK cells and a subset of T cells. In cytolytic conjugates between NK cells and target cells expressing its ligand MHC class I chain-related gene A, NKG2D accumulates at the immunological synapse with GM1-rich microdomains. Furthermore, NKG2D is specifically recruited to detergent-resistant membrane fractions upon ligation. However, in the presence of a strong inhibitory stimulus, NKG2D-mediated cytotoxicity can be intercepted, and recruitment of NKG2D to the immunological synapse and detergent-resistant membrane fractions is blocked. Also, downstream phosphorylation of Vav-1 triggered by NKG2D ligation is circumvented by coengaging inhibitory receptors. Thus, we propose that one way in which inhibitory signaling can control NKG2D-mediated activation is by blocking its recruitment to GM1-rich membrane domains. The accumulation of activating NK cell receptors in GM1-rich microdomains may provide the necessary platform from which stimulatory signals can proceed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5606-5611
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume178
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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    Endt, J., McCann, F. E., Almeida, C. R., Urlaub, D., Leung, R., Pende, D., Davis, D. M., & Watzl, C. (2007). Inhibitory receptor signals suppress ligation-induced recruitment of NKG2D to GM1-rich membrane domains at the human NK cell immune synapse. Journal of Immunology, 178(9), 5606-5611.