Intake of Selected Micronutrients and the Risk of Surgically Treated Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Case-Control Study from Italy

Alessandra Tavani, Elisa Longoni, Cristina Bosetti, Luigino Dal Maso, Jerry Polesel, Maurizio Montella, Valerio Ramazzotti, Eva Negri, Silvia Franceschi, Carlo La Vecchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To analyze the relationship between surgically treated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and intake of selected micronutrients. Methods: A multicentric case-control study was conducted in Italy between 1991 and 2002. Cases were 1369 men with histologically confirmed, surgically treated BPH and controls were 1451 men younger than 75 yr, frequency matched by quinquennium of age and study center, admitted to the hospital for acute nonneoplastic diseases. Information was collected by trained interviewers using a structured validated food-frequency questionnaire. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional multiple logistic regression models. Results: The risk of BPH significantly decreased with increasing intake of carotene (OR = 0.80 for an increment equal to the difference between the 80th and 20th percentile of intake), α-carotene (OR = 0.83), β-carotene (OR = 0.82), and cis β-carotene (OR = 0.82) and tended to decrease with the intake of vitamin C (OR = 0.89) and iron (OR = 0.79). The OR tended to increase with the intake of sodium (OR = 1.30) and zinc (OR = 1.10). No systematic heterogeneity was observed across strata of age, education, and body mass index. No meaningful associations emerged for other antioxidants, such as folic acid, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, vitamin E, vitamin D, nor for retinol. Conclusions: Our results suggest a protective effect of carotene on the risk of BPH. The risk tended to decrease also with the intake of vitamin C and iron and tended to increase with the intake of sodium and zinc. Results also indicate that other antioxidants, including folic acid, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, and vitamins D and E, and retinol were not related to the risk for this disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)549-554
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Urology
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

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Micronutrients
Prostatic Hyperplasia
Italy
Case-Control Studies
Odds Ratio
Carotenoids
Lutein
Vitamin A
Vitamin E
Folic Acid
Vitamin D
Ascorbic Acid
Zinc
Iron
Antioxidants
Logistic Models
Sodium
Acute Disease
Body Mass Index
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia
  • Micronutrients
  • Risk factors
  • Vitamins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Intake of Selected Micronutrients and the Risk of Surgically Treated Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia : A Case-Control Study from Italy. / Tavani, Alessandra; Longoni, Elisa; Bosetti, Cristina; Maso, Luigino Dal; Polesel, Jerry; Montella, Maurizio; Ramazzotti, Valerio; Negri, Eva; Franceschi, Silvia; Vecchia, Carlo La.

In: European Urology, Vol. 50, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 549-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To analyze the relationship between surgically treated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and intake of selected micronutrients. Methods: A multicentric case-control study was conducted in Italy between 1991 and 2002. Cases were 1369 men with histologically confirmed, surgically treated BPH and controls were 1451 men younger than 75 yr, frequency matched by quinquennium of age and study center, admitted to the hospital for acute nonneoplastic diseases. Information was collected by trained interviewers using a structured validated food-frequency questionnaire. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional multiple logistic regression models. Results: The risk of BPH significantly decreased with increasing intake of carotene (OR = 0.80 for an increment equal to the difference between the 80th and 20th percentile of intake), α-carotene (OR = 0.83), β-carotene (OR = 0.82), and cis β-carotene (OR = 0.82) and tended to decrease with the intake of vitamin C (OR = 0.89) and iron (OR = 0.79). The OR tended to increase with the intake of sodium (OR = 1.30) and zinc (OR = 1.10). No systematic heterogeneity was observed across strata of age, education, and body mass index. No meaningful associations emerged for other antioxidants, such as folic acid, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, vitamin E, vitamin D, nor for retinol. Conclusions: Our results suggest a protective effect of carotene on the risk of BPH. The risk tended to decrease also with the intake of vitamin C and iron and tended to increase with the intake of sodium and zinc. Results also indicate that other antioxidants, including folic acid, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, and vitamins D and E, and retinol were not related to the risk for this disease.",
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AU - Bosetti, Cristina

AU - Maso, Luigino Dal

AU - Polesel, Jerry

AU - Montella, Maurizio

AU - Ramazzotti, Valerio

AU - Negri, Eva

AU - Franceschi, Silvia

AU - Vecchia, Carlo La

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AB - Objective: To analyze the relationship between surgically treated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and intake of selected micronutrients. Methods: A multicentric case-control study was conducted in Italy between 1991 and 2002. Cases were 1369 men with histologically confirmed, surgically treated BPH and controls were 1451 men younger than 75 yr, frequency matched by quinquennium of age and study center, admitted to the hospital for acute nonneoplastic diseases. Information was collected by trained interviewers using a structured validated food-frequency questionnaire. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional multiple logistic regression models. Results: The risk of BPH significantly decreased with increasing intake of carotene (OR = 0.80 for an increment equal to the difference between the 80th and 20th percentile of intake), α-carotene (OR = 0.83), β-carotene (OR = 0.82), and cis β-carotene (OR = 0.82) and tended to decrease with the intake of vitamin C (OR = 0.89) and iron (OR = 0.79). The OR tended to increase with the intake of sodium (OR = 1.30) and zinc (OR = 1.10). No systematic heterogeneity was observed across strata of age, education, and body mass index. No meaningful associations emerged for other antioxidants, such as folic acid, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, vitamin E, vitamin D, nor for retinol. Conclusions: Our results suggest a protective effect of carotene on the risk of BPH. The risk tended to decrease also with the intake of vitamin C and iron and tended to increase with the intake of sodium and zinc. Results also indicate that other antioxidants, including folic acid, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, and vitamins D and E, and retinol were not related to the risk for this disease.

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