Intensive cycle ergometer training improves gait speed and endurance in patients with Parkinson's disease: A comparison with treadmill training

Ilaria Arcolin, Fabrizio Pisano, Carmen Delconte, Marco Godi, Marco Schieppati, Alessandro Mezzani, Daniele Picco, Margherita Grasso, Antonio Nardone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Cycle ergometer training improves gait in the elderly, but its effect in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is not completely known. Methods: Twenty-nine PD inpatients were randomized to treadmill (n = 13, PD-T) or cycle ergometer (n = 16, PD-C) training for 3 weeks, 1 hour/day. Outcome measures were distance travelled during the 6-min walking test (6MWT), spatio-temporal variables of gait assessed by baropodometry, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) duration, the balance score through the Mini-BESTest, and the score of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Results: Sex, age, body mass index, disease duration, Hoehn-Yahr staging, comorbidity and medication did not differ between groups. At end of training, ANCOVA showed significant improvement, of similar degree, in both groups for 6MWT, speed, step length and cadence of gait, TUG, Mini-BESTest and UPDRS. Conclusions: This pilot study shows that cycle ergometer training improves walking parameters and reduces clinical signs of PD, as much as treadmill training does. Gait velocity is accompanied by step lengthening, making the gait pattern close to that of healthy subjects. Cycle ergometer is a valid alternative to treadmill for improving gait in short term in patients with PD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-138
Number of pages14
JournalRestorative Neurology and Neuroscience
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Gait
Parkinson Disease
Walking
Exercise Test
Walking Speed
Comorbidity
Inpatients
Healthy Volunteers
Body Mass Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Aerobic exercise
  • Balance
  • Cycle ergometer
  • Gait
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • Treadmill

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Intensive cycle ergometer training improves gait speed and endurance in patients with Parkinson's disease: A comparison with treadmill training",
abstract = "Purpose: Cycle ergometer training improves gait in the elderly, but its effect in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is not completely known. Methods: Twenty-nine PD inpatients were randomized to treadmill (n = 13, PD-T) or cycle ergometer (n = 16, PD-C) training for 3 weeks, 1 hour/day. Outcome measures were distance travelled during the 6-min walking test (6MWT), spatio-temporal variables of gait assessed by baropodometry, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) duration, the balance score through the Mini-BESTest, and the score of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Results: Sex, age, body mass index, disease duration, Hoehn-Yahr staging, comorbidity and medication did not differ between groups. At end of training, ANCOVA showed significant improvement, of similar degree, in both groups for 6MWT, speed, step length and cadence of gait, TUG, Mini-BESTest and UPDRS. Conclusions: This pilot study shows that cycle ergometer training improves walking parameters and reduces clinical signs of PD, as much as treadmill training does. Gait velocity is accompanied by step lengthening, making the gait pattern close to that of healthy subjects. Cycle ergometer is a valid alternative to treadmill for improving gait in short term in patients with PD.",
keywords = "Aerobic exercise, Balance, Cycle ergometer, Gait, Parkinson's Disease, Treadmill",
author = "Ilaria Arcolin and Fabrizio Pisano and Carmen Delconte and Marco Godi and Marco Schieppati and Alessandro Mezzani and Daniele Picco and Margherita Grasso and Antonio Nardone",
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T1 - Intensive cycle ergometer training improves gait speed and endurance in patients with Parkinson's disease

T2 - A comparison with treadmill training

AU - Arcolin, Ilaria

AU - Pisano, Fabrizio

AU - Delconte, Carmen

AU - Godi, Marco

AU - Schieppati, Marco

AU - Mezzani, Alessandro

AU - Picco, Daniele

AU - Grasso, Margherita

AU - Nardone, Antonio

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Purpose: Cycle ergometer training improves gait in the elderly, but its effect in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is not completely known. Methods: Twenty-nine PD inpatients were randomized to treadmill (n = 13, PD-T) or cycle ergometer (n = 16, PD-C) training for 3 weeks, 1 hour/day. Outcome measures were distance travelled during the 6-min walking test (6MWT), spatio-temporal variables of gait assessed by baropodometry, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) duration, the balance score through the Mini-BESTest, and the score of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Results: Sex, age, body mass index, disease duration, Hoehn-Yahr staging, comorbidity and medication did not differ between groups. At end of training, ANCOVA showed significant improvement, of similar degree, in both groups for 6MWT, speed, step length and cadence of gait, TUG, Mini-BESTest and UPDRS. Conclusions: This pilot study shows that cycle ergometer training improves walking parameters and reduces clinical signs of PD, as much as treadmill training does. Gait velocity is accompanied by step lengthening, making the gait pattern close to that of healthy subjects. Cycle ergometer is a valid alternative to treadmill for improving gait in short term in patients with PD.

AB - Purpose: Cycle ergometer training improves gait in the elderly, but its effect in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is not completely known. Methods: Twenty-nine PD inpatients were randomized to treadmill (n = 13, PD-T) or cycle ergometer (n = 16, PD-C) training for 3 weeks, 1 hour/day. Outcome measures were distance travelled during the 6-min walking test (6MWT), spatio-temporal variables of gait assessed by baropodometry, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) duration, the balance score through the Mini-BESTest, and the score of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Results: Sex, age, body mass index, disease duration, Hoehn-Yahr staging, comorbidity and medication did not differ between groups. At end of training, ANCOVA showed significant improvement, of similar degree, in both groups for 6MWT, speed, step length and cadence of gait, TUG, Mini-BESTest and UPDRS. Conclusions: This pilot study shows that cycle ergometer training improves walking parameters and reduces clinical signs of PD, as much as treadmill training does. Gait velocity is accompanied by step lengthening, making the gait pattern close to that of healthy subjects. Cycle ergometer is a valid alternative to treadmill for improving gait in short term in patients with PD.

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